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Effects of intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and a combination of both drugs on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs

Yukie Ueyama DVM1, Phillip Lerche BVSc, PhD2, C. Mark Eppler PhD3, and William W. Muir III DVM, PhD4
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; and Fort Dodge Animal Health, 9 Ridge Rd, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; and Fort Dodge Animal Health, 9 Ridge Rd, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; and Fort Dodge Animal Health, 9 Ridge Rd, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; and Fort Dodge Animal Health, 9 Ridge Rd, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of IV administration of perzinfotel and a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy sexually intact Beagles (3 males and 3 females).

Procedures—All dogs were instrumented with a telemetry device for continuous monitoring of heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and core body temperature (at a femoral artery). Dogs were anesthetized with propofol (6 mg/kg, IV) and isoflurane. Isoflurane MAC values were determined in 3 experiments in each dog, separated by at least 7 days, before (baseline) and after the following treatments: no treatment (anesthetic only), perzinfotel (20 mg/kg, IV), fentanyl (5 μg/kg bolus, IV, followed by a continuous IV infusion at 0.15 μg/kg/min), and a fentanyl-perzinfotel combination (20 mg of perzinfotel/kg, IV, plus the fentanyl infusion). Bispectral index and oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were also monitored throughout anesthesia.

Results—Without treatment, the mean ± SD isoflurane MAC for all 6 dogs was 1.41 ± 0.10%. Baseline MAC was 1.42 ± 0.08%. Intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and the perzinfotel-fentanyl combination significantly decreased the MAC by 39%, 35%, and 66%, respectively. Perzinfotel and perzinfotel-fentanyl administration yielded significant increases in the bispectral index. Mean, systolic, and diastolic arterial blood pressures significantly increased from baseline values when perzinfotel was administered. Systolic arterial blood pressure significantly increased from the baseline value when perzinfotel-fentanyl was administered. No adverse effects were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IV administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, or a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination reduced isoflurane MAC in dogs and increased arterial blood pressure.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Fort Dodge Animal Health.

The authors thank Dr. Anja-Christina Waselau and Barbara Lang for technical assistance and Debbie Amodie for statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Muir (bill.muir@amcny.org).