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Pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in serum and synovial fluid after regional intravenous perfusion in the distal portion of the hind limb of adult cows

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 3 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
  • | 4 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 5 Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Abstract

Objective—To define the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in synovial fluid (SYNF) and serum from central venous (CV) and digital venous (DV) blood samples following regional IV perfusion (RIVP) of the distal portion of the hind limb in cows.

Animals—6 healthy adult cows.

Procedures—In each cow, IV catheters were placed in the dorsal common digital vein (DCDV) and the plantar vein of the lateral digit, and an indwelling catheter was placed in the metatarsophalangeal joint of the left hind limb. A pneumatic tourniquet was applied to the midmetatarsal region. Florfenicol (2.2 mg/kg) was administered into the DCDV. Samples of DV blood, SYNF, and CV (jugular) blood were collected after 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 hours, and the tourniquet was removed; additional samples were collected at intervals for 24 hours after infusion. Florfenicol analysis was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—In DV blood, CV blood, and SYNF, mean ± SD maximum florfenicol concentration was 714.79 ± 301.93 μg/mL, 5.90 ± 1.37 μg/mL, and 39.19 ± 29.42 μg/mL, respectively; area under the concentration versus time curve was 488.14 ± 272.53 h•μg•mL−1, 23.10 ± 6.91 h•μg•mL−1, and 113.82 ± 54.71 h•μg•mL−1, respectively; and half-life was 4.09 ± 1.93 hours, 4.77 ± 0.67 hours, and 3.81 ± 0.81 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Following RIVP, high florfenicol concentrations were achieved in DV blood and SYNF, whereas the CV blood concentration remained low. In cattle, RIVP of florfenicol may be useful in the treatment of infectious processes involving the distal portion of limbs.

Abstract

Objective—To define the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in synovial fluid (SYNF) and serum from central venous (CV) and digital venous (DV) blood samples following regional IV perfusion (RIVP) of the distal portion of the hind limb in cows.

Animals—6 healthy adult cows.

Procedures—In each cow, IV catheters were placed in the dorsal common digital vein (DCDV) and the plantar vein of the lateral digit, and an indwelling catheter was placed in the metatarsophalangeal joint of the left hind limb. A pneumatic tourniquet was applied to the midmetatarsal region. Florfenicol (2.2 mg/kg) was administered into the DCDV. Samples of DV blood, SYNF, and CV (jugular) blood were collected after 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 hours, and the tourniquet was removed; additional samples were collected at intervals for 24 hours after infusion. Florfenicol analysis was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—In DV blood, CV blood, and SYNF, mean ± SD maximum florfenicol concentration was 714.79 ± 301.93 μg/mL, 5.90 ± 1.37 μg/mL, and 39.19 ± 29.42 μg/mL, respectively; area under the concentration versus time curve was 488.14 ± 272.53 h•μg•mL−1, 23.10 ± 6.91 h•μg•mL−1, and 113.82 ± 54.71 h•μg•mL−1, respectively; and half-life was 4.09 ± 1.93 hours, 4.77 ± 0.67 hours, and 3.81 ± 0.81 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Following RIVP, high florfenicol concentrations were achieved in DV blood and SYNF, whereas the CV blood concentration remained low. In cattle, RIVP of florfenicol may be useful in the treatment of infectious processes involving the distal portion of limbs.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Research Advisory Council, Oklahoma State University and Schering-Plough Animal Health. One of the authors (MGP) has been a consultant for the manufacturer of florfenicol, Schering-Plough Corporation and has also received research support funding from Schering-Plough Corporation.

Presented in abstract format at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum, Seattle, June 2007.

The authors thank Delta Dise for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gilliam.