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Comparison of distributions of survivin among tissues from urinary bladders of dogs with cystitis, transitional cell carcinoma, or histologically normal urinary bladders

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 8 Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

Objective—To compare distributions of survivin among tissues from urinary bladders of dogs with cystitis, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), or histologically normal urinary bladders.

Sample Population—24 archived and 7 fresh-frozen specimens of urinary bladders from dogs with cystitis.

Procedures—Immunohistochemical analysis of archived tissue specimens was performed to identify survivin protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells by use of polyclonal rabbit anti-survivin antibody. Tissues that contained ≥ 5% immunoreactive cells were considered positive for survivin protein. Reverse-transcription PCR analysis was performed on fresh-frozen tissues to identify survivin mRNA. Data on tissues from dogs with TCC or histologically normal urinary bladders that were obtained during another study were used for statistical comparisons.

Results—Twelve of 24 (50%) cystitic tissues were positive for nuclear survivin, compared with 28 of 41 (68%) TCC tissues and 0 of 46 (0%) normal tissues. Two of 24 (8%) cystitic tissues were positive for cytoplasmic survivin, compared with 7 of 41 (17%) TCC tissues and 17 of 46 (37%) normal tissues. Proportions of specimens that contained nuclear or cytoplasmic survivin were significantly different between cystitic and normal tissues but not between cystitic and TCC tissues. Four of 7 cystitic tissues were positive for survivin mRNA, which was comparable with results for TCC and normal tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Nuclear survivin was detected in TCC and cystitic tissues but not in normal urinary bladder tissues. Additional studies are needed to determine whether nuclear survivin contributes to the development or progression of TCC.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Rankin's present address is Veterinary Medical Specialists, 7121 Amador Valley Blvd, Dublin, CA 94568.

Presented in part at the Veterinary Cancer Society Meeting, Fort Lauderdale, Fla, November 2007.

Address correspondence to Dr. Rankin.