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Comparisons of morphometric measurements and serum insulin-like growth factor concentration in healthy cats and cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Vicky K. Yang PhD1, Lisa M. Freeman DVM, PhD2, and John E. Rush DVM, MS3
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Abstract

Objective—To compare morphometric measurements and serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) concentration in cats with and without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and assess the hypothesis that cats with HCM have larger body size and skeletal features and higher serum IGF-1 concentrations than healthy cats.

Animals—25 cats with HCM and 22 healthy control cats.

Procedures—Physical examination and echocardiography were performed to classify cats into the HCM and control groups. Data collected from each cat included diet history, body weight, body condition score, lengths of the humerus and 4th and 12th thoracic vertebrae, heart size, head length and width, and abdominal circumferences. Comparisons of these variables were made between groups.

Results—Body condition score in HCM-affected and control cats did not differ significantly. However, median head width; lengths of the head, 4th and 12th thoracic vertebrae, and humerus; and body weight in the HCM-affected group were significantly greater than values in the control group. Median serum concentration of IGF-1 was not significantly different between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These data suggested that among the study cats, those with HCM were skeletally larger, but not more obese, than healthy cats. Whether this was attributable to differences in early growth or other causes requires additional investigation.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health and the Barkley Fund.

Presented in abstract form at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum, Seattle, June 2007.

Address correspondence to Dr. Freeman.