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Determination of serologic and colostral response in late-gestation cows vaccinated with a Mycoplasma bovis bacterin

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 67432.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 6 Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccinating cows during late gestation against Mycoplasma bovis will result in adequate concentrations of M bovis–specific IgG1 in serum, colostrum, and milk.

Animals—78 dairy cows.

Procedures—Serum samples were obtained 60 and 39 days prior to expected parturition in vaccinated and control cows from a single herd. Serum and colostrum samples were also obtained at parturition. Milk samples were obtained 7 to 14 days after parturition. Samples were analyzed for anti–M bovis IgG1 concentrations.

Results—Prior to vaccination, control and vaccinated cows had similar anti–M bovis IgG1 concentrations. After initial vaccination and subsequent booster and at parturition, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups, with vaccinated cows having higher IgG concentrations. Colostrum from vaccinated cows had higher anti–M bovis IgG1 concentrations, compared with control cows; however, IgG1 concentrations in milk did not differ between the 2 groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vaccination of late-gestation cows resulted in increased concentrations of anti–M bovis IgG1 in colostrum. However, ingestion of colostrum by calves may not guarantee protection against M bovis infection.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Calloway's present address is Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada.

Supported by Boehringer Ingelhiem Vetmedica Inc, St Joseph, Mo.

The authors thank Julie Holle, Kathy Smith, and Dr. Craig Jones for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Calloway.