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Comparison of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogen concentration in blood samples collected via an intravenous catheter versus direct venipuncture in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

Abstract

Objective—To compare prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen concentration in canine blood samples collected via an indwelling IV catheter and direct venipuncture.

Animals—35 dogs admitted to an intensive care unit that required placement of an IV catheter for treatment.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected via IV catheter and direct venipuncture at the time of catheter placement and 24 hours after catheter placement. Prothrombin time, APTT, and fibrinogen concentration were measured.

Results—5 dogs were excluded from the study; results were obtained for the remaining 30 dogs. Agreement (bias) for PT was −0.327 seconds (limits of agreement, −1.350 to 0.696 seconds) and 0.003 seconds (limits of agreement, −1.120 to 1.127 seconds) for the 0- and 24-hour time points, respectively. Agreement for APTT was −0.423 seconds (limits of agreement, −3.123 to 2.276 seconds) and 0.677 seconds (limits of agreement, −3.854 to 5.207 seconds) for the 0- and 24-hour time points, respectively. Agreement for fibrinogen concentration was −2.333 mg/dL (limits of agreement, −80.639 to 75.973 mg/dL) and −1.767 mg/dL (limits of agreement, −50.056 to 46.523 mg/dL) for the 0- and 24-hour time points, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Agreement between the 2 techniques for sample collection was clinically acceptable for PT, APTT, and fibrinogen concentration at time 0 and 24 hours. It is often difficult or undesirable to perform multiple direct venipunctures in critically ill patients. Use of samples collected via an IV catheter to monitor PT and APTT can eliminate additional venous trauma and patient discomfort and reduce the volume of blood collected from these compromised patients.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Maeckelbergh's present address is The Hope Center for Advanced Veterinary Medicine, 140 Park St, Vienna, VA 22180.

Supported by the Waltham Foundation.

Address correspondence to Dr. Maeckelbergh.