Evaluation of induction characteristics and hypnotic potency of isoflurane and sevoflurane in healthy dogs

Erik H. Hofmeister Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Benjamin M. Brainard Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Lisa M. Sams Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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David A. Allman Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Ashley M. Cruse Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine induction characteristics and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) at which consciousness returned (MACawake) in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

Animals—20 sexually intact male Beagles.

Procedures—In experiment 1, 20 dogs were randomly assigned to have anesthesia induced and maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The MAC at which each dog awoke in response to auditory stimulation (MACawake-noise) was determined by decreasing the end-tidal concentration by 0.1 volume (vol %) every 15 minutes and delivering a standard audible stimulus at each concentration until the dog awoke. In experiment 2, 12 dogs received the same anesthetic agent they were administered in experiment 1. After duplicate MAC determination, the end-tidal concentration was continually decreased by 10% every 15 minutes until the dog awoke from anesthesia (MACawake).

Results—Mean induction time was significantly greater for isoflurane-anesthetized dogs (212 seconds), compared with the sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs (154 seconds). Mean ± SD MACawake-noise was 1.1 ± 0.1 vol % for isoflurane and 2.0 ± 0.2 vol % for sevoflurane. Mean MAC was 1.3 ± 0.2 vol % for isoflurane and 2.1 ± 0.6 vol % for sevoflurane, and mean MACawake was 1.0 ± 0.1 vol % for isoflurane and 1.3 ± 0.3 vol % for sevoflurane.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sevoflurane resulted in a more rapid induction than did isoflurane. The MACawake for dogs was higher than values reported for both agents in humans. Care should be taken to ensure that dogs are at an appropriate anesthetic depth to prevent consciousness, particularly when single-agent inhalant anesthesia is used.

Abstract

Objective—To determine induction characteristics and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) at which consciousness returned (MACawake) in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

Animals—20 sexually intact male Beagles.

Procedures—In experiment 1, 20 dogs were randomly assigned to have anesthesia induced and maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The MAC at which each dog awoke in response to auditory stimulation (MACawake-noise) was determined by decreasing the end-tidal concentration by 0.1 volume (vol %) every 15 minutes and delivering a standard audible stimulus at each concentration until the dog awoke. In experiment 2, 12 dogs received the same anesthetic agent they were administered in experiment 1. After duplicate MAC determination, the end-tidal concentration was continually decreased by 10% every 15 minutes until the dog awoke from anesthesia (MACawake).

Results—Mean induction time was significantly greater for isoflurane-anesthetized dogs (212 seconds), compared with the sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs (154 seconds). Mean ± SD MACawake-noise was 1.1 ± 0.1 vol % for isoflurane and 2.0 ± 0.2 vol % for sevoflurane. Mean MAC was 1.3 ± 0.2 vol % for isoflurane and 2.1 ± 0.6 vol % for sevoflurane, and mean MACawake was 1.0 ± 0.1 vol % for isoflurane and 1.3 ± 0.3 vol % for sevoflurane.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sevoflurane resulted in a more rapid induction than did isoflurane. The MACawake for dogs was higher than values reported for both agents in humans. Care should be taken to ensure that dogs are at an appropriate anesthetic depth to prevent consciousness, particularly when single-agent inhalant anesthesia is used.

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