• 1.

    Pavlin CJ, Sherar MD, Foster FS. Subsurface ultrasound microscopic imaging of the intact eye. Ophthalmology 1990;97:244250.

  • 2.

    Kurimoto Y, Park M, Sakaue H, et al. Changes in the anterior chamber configuration after small-incision cataract surgery with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Am J Ophthalmol 1997;124:775780.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Pereira FA, Cronemberger S. Ultrasound biomicroscopic study of anterior segment changes after phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lens implantation. Ophthalmology 2003;110:17991806.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Tello C, Liebmann J, Potash SD, et al. Measurement of ultrasound biomicroscopy images: intraobserver and interobserver reliability. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1994;35:35493552.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Kurimoto Y, Park M, Kiryu J, et al. Reliability of quantitative measurement of anterior chamber using ultrasound biomicroscopy. J Eye 1996;13:445449.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Bentley E, Miller PE, Diehl KA. Evaluation of intra- and interobserver reliability and image reproducibility to assess usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography for measurement of anterior segment structures of canine eyes. Am J Vet Res 2005;66:17751779.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Bentley E, Miller PE, Diehl KA. Use of high-resolution ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in veterinary ophthalmology. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:16171622.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Gibson TE, Roberts SM, Severin GA, et al. Comparison of gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy for evaluating the iridocorneal angle in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:635638.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Smith PJ, Brooks DE, Lazarus JA, et al. Ocular hypertension following cataract surgery in dogs: 139 cases (1992–1993). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:105111.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Chahory S, Clerc B, Guez J, et al. Intraocular pressure development after cataract surgery: a prospective study in 50 dogs (1998–2000). Vet Ophthalmol 2003;6:105112.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Miller PE, Stanz KM, Dubielzig RR, et al. Mechanisms of acute intraocular pressure increases after phacoemulsification lens extraction in dogs. Am J Vet Res 1997;58:11591165.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Turner ST. Ophthalmic examination including diagnostic tests. In: Turner ST. Veterinary ophthalmology, a manual for nurses and technicians. Philadelphia: Elsevier, 2005;3940.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Slatter D. The lens. In: Fundamentals of veterinary ophthalmology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2001;339340, 390.

  • 14.

    Pavlin CJ, Harasiewicz K, Sherar MD, et al. Clinical use of ultrasound biomicroscopy. Ophthalmology 1991;98:287295.

  • 15.

    Glover TD, Constantinescu GM. Surgery for cataracts. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1997;27:11431173.

  • 16.

    Dohoo IR, Martin W, Stryhn H. Chapters 20–22. In: Veterinary epidemiologic research. 4th ed. Charlottetown, PE: University of Prince Edward Island, 2004;459520.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Littell RC, Milliken GA, Stroup WW, et al. SAS system for mixed models. Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc, 1996;633.

  • 18.

    Nissirios N, Ramos-Esteban J, Danias J. Ultrasound biomicroscopy of the rat eye: effects of cholinergic and anticholinergic agents. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2005;243:469473.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Williams DL. Lens morphometry determined by B-mode ultrasonography of the normal and cataractous canine lens. Vet Ophthalmol 2004;7:9195.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Anderson BG, Anderson WD. Vasculature of the equine and canine iris. Am J Vet Res 1977;38:17911799.

  • 21.

    Gelatt KN. Ophthalmic anatomy. In: Veterinary ophthalmology. 2nd ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 1999;7984.

  • 22.

    Kobayashi H, Kobayashi K, Kiryu J, et al. Pilocarpine induces an increase in the anterior chamber angular width in eyes with narrow angles. Br J Ophthalmol 1999;83:553558.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Ultrasound biomicroscopy of the iridocorneal angle of the eye before and after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in dogs

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the iridocorneal angle (ICA) and angle opening distance (AOD) in dogs with cataractous and noncataractous lenses; evaluate cataractous eyes ultrasono-graphically for association of postoperative ocular hypertension (POH) with the ICA, AOD, and postoperative echogenic anterior chamber debris; and evaluate intraobserver reliability associated with ICA and AOD measurements.

Animals—56 dogs with 102 cataracts, and 23 clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed on 102 eyes of 56 dogs before and after cataract surgery and on 46 nondilated and dilated eyes of 23 clinically normal dogs. Cataract stage, ICA, AOD, and association with POH were assessed.

Results—Cataract stage and ICA or AOD were not significantly associated; however, ICA and AOD typically decreased with increasing cataract maturity. Before and after pupillary dilation, AODs were significantly smaller in cataractous eyes than in noncataractous eyes. Before surgery, ICA and AOD in eyes without pupillary dilation were significantly associated with POH. At > 13°, odds of developing POH increased by 11% for each degree increase in the ICA. Postoperative anterior chamber debris was not associated with POH. Coefficient of variation for repeated measurements was 10% for the ICA and 9.5% for the AOD, suggesting good intraobserver reliability.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In this study, dogs with larger ICA and AOD measurements before surgery were at greater risk of developing POH. This information may be useful for future studies to determine whether preventative treatment for POH administered prior to surgery may be beneficial.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Rose's present address is Michigan Veterinary Specialists, 29080 Inkster Rd, Southfield, MI 48034. Dr. Mattoon's present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Supported by The Ohio State University Paladin Research Grant.

Presented at the American College of Veterinary Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting, Chicago Ill, December 2005.

Address correspondence to Dr. Rose.