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Assessment of diuretic effects and changes in plasma aldosterone concentration following oral administration of a single dose of furosemide or azosemide in healthy dogs

Yasutomo Hori DVM1, Akiko Katou DVM2, Mizuho Tsubaki DVM3, Kazutaka Kanai DVM, PhD4, Ruriko Nakao DVM, PhD5, Fumio Hoshi DVM, PhD6, Naoyuki Itoh DVM, PhD7, and Sei-ichi Higuchi DVM, PhD8
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 7 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
  • | 8 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diuretic effects and changes in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) following oral administration of a single dose of furosemide or azosemide in healthy dogs.

Animals—8 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—A single dose of furosemide (2 mg/kg), azosemide (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or placebo (bifidobacterium [1 mg/kg]) was administered orally (in random order at 7-day intervals) to each dog (5 treatments/dog). Urine and blood samples were collected before (2 hours after evacuation of the urinary bladder; baseline) and at intervals for 24 hours after drug treatment to assess urine volume and plasma and urine biochemical variables.

Results—Compared with baseline values, treatment with furosemide and azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) increased urine output for 1 to 2 hours and 2 to 4 hours, respectively. The 24-hour urine volume and urinary sodium excretion were significantly increased following furosemide and azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) treatments, compared with effects of pla-cebo; these increases were dose dependent for azosemide, and increases were similar for furosemide and the 5 mg/kg dose of azosemide. Compared with other treatments, 24-hour urinary potassium excretion was significantly increased with azosemide at 10 mg/kg. Azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly increased plasma total protein concentration and decreased plasma potassium concentration, compared with baseline values. Compared with the effect of placebo, PAC was significantly increased by furosemide and the 10 mg/kg dose of azosemide.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy dogs, a moderate dose of azosemide caused sufficient diuretic action and increased PAC to a lesser extent than furosemide.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diuretic effects and changes in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) following oral administration of a single dose of furosemide or azosemide in healthy dogs.

Animals—8 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—A single dose of furosemide (2 mg/kg), azosemide (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or placebo (bifidobacterium [1 mg/kg]) was administered orally (in random order at 7-day intervals) to each dog (5 treatments/dog). Urine and blood samples were collected before (2 hours after evacuation of the urinary bladder; baseline) and at intervals for 24 hours after drug treatment to assess urine volume and plasma and urine biochemical variables.

Results—Compared with baseline values, treatment with furosemide and azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) increased urine output for 1 to 2 hours and 2 to 4 hours, respectively. The 24-hour urine volume and urinary sodium excretion were significantly increased following furosemide and azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) treatments, compared with effects of pla-cebo; these increases were dose dependent for azosemide, and increases were similar for furosemide and the 5 mg/kg dose of azosemide. Compared with other treatments, 24-hour urinary potassium excretion was significantly increased with azosemide at 10 mg/kg. Azosemide (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly increased plasma total protein concentration and decreased plasma potassium concentration, compared with baseline values. Compared with the effect of placebo, PAC was significantly increased by furosemide and the 10 mg/kg dose of azosemide.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy dogs, a moderate dose of azosemide caused sufficient diuretic action and increased PAC to a lesser extent than furosemide.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Hori.