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Assessment of a dimethyl sulfoxide–stabilized frozen canine platelet concentrate

Julien Guillaumin Doct. Vet.1, Karl E. Jandrey DVM2, Jeffrey W. Norris PhD3, and Fern Tablin VMD, PhD4
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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 2 Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 3 Department of Anatomy, Physiology & Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 4 Department of Anatomy, Physiology & Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

Abstract

Objective—To assess platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), metabolic characteristics, and platelet function in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)–stabilized canine frozen platelet concentrate (PC).

Sample Population—11 units of a commercial frozen PC in 6% DMSO and fresh plateletrich plasma from 6 healthy control dogs.

Procedures—PCs were thawed, and the following data were collected: thaw time, platelet count, MPV, pH, PCO2, and PO2 and HCO3, glucose, and lactate content. Phosphatidylserine translocation was determined by use of flow cytometry. Fresh platelet-rich plasma from healthy dogs served as a source of control platelets for flow cytometric analysis.

Results—At thaw, the platelet count in the frozen PC ranged from 243,000 to 742,000 platelets/μL. Median platelet count of paired samples was 680,000 platelets/μL and decreased significantly to 509,000 platelets/μL at 2 hours after thaw. Median MPV at thaw was 11.15 femtoliters and was stable after 2 hours. Compared with fresh platelets, frozen PC had increased amounts of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the platelet membrane in the resting (ie, not treated with thrombin) state (19% vs 99%, respectively) and alterations in cellular morphology, all of which were consistent with platelet activation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this in vitro study indicated that there was a decrease in platelet quantity and function as well as an increase in platelet activation during the freeze-and-thaw process in DMSO-stabilized canine frozen PC. In vivo effects on PC remain to be determined.

Abstract

Objective—To assess platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), metabolic characteristics, and platelet function in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)–stabilized canine frozen platelet concentrate (PC).

Sample Population—11 units of a commercial frozen PC in 6% DMSO and fresh plateletrich plasma from 6 healthy control dogs.

Procedures—PCs were thawed, and the following data were collected: thaw time, platelet count, MPV, pH, PCO2, and PO2 and HCO3, glucose, and lactate content. Phosphatidylserine translocation was determined by use of flow cytometry. Fresh platelet-rich plasma from healthy dogs served as a source of control platelets for flow cytometric analysis.

Results—At thaw, the platelet count in the frozen PC ranged from 243,000 to 742,000 platelets/μL. Median platelet count of paired samples was 680,000 platelets/μL and decreased significantly to 509,000 platelets/μL at 2 hours after thaw. Median MPV at thaw was 11.15 femtoliters and was stable after 2 hours. Compared with fresh platelets, frozen PC had increased amounts of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the platelet membrane in the resting (ie, not treated with thrombin) state (19% vs 99%, respectively) and alterations in cellular morphology, all of which were consistent with platelet activation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this in vitro study indicated that there was a decrease in platelet quantity and function as well as an increase in platelet activation during the freeze-and-thaw process in DMSO-stabilized canine frozen PC. In vivo effects on PC remain to be determined.

Contributor Notes

This work was supported by the Center for Companion Animal Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis.

The authors thank Dr. Michael Kent and Naomi Walker for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Guillaumin.