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Effects of simulated digests of Biota orientalis and a dietary nutraceutical on interleukin-1– induced inflammatory responses in cartilage explants

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  • 1 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
  • | 2 Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
  • | 3 Department of Animal and Poultry Science, Ontario Agriculture College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
  • | 4 Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, College of Biological Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that simulated digests of Biota orientalis (BO) and a dietary nutraceutical (DN; composed of mussel, shark cartilage, abalone, and BO seed lipid extract) inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO), and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in interleukin (IL)-1–stimulated cartilage explants.

Sample Population—Cartilage tissue from 12 pigs.

Procedures—Articular cartilage explants were conditioned with a simulated digest of BO (BOsim) or DN (DNsim) at concentrations of 0, 0.06, or 0.18 mg/mL or indomethacin (INDOsim; 0 or 0.02 mg/mL) for 72 hours. Control explants received digest vehicle only. Explants were or were not stimulated with recombinant human-IL-1β (10 or 0 ng/mL) during the final 48 hours of culture. Concentrations of PGE2, GAG, and NO in media samples (mPGE2,mGAG, and mNO concentrations, respectively) were analyzed, and explant tissue was stained fluorochromatically to determine chondrocyte viability. Treatment effects during the final 48-hour culture period were analyzed.

Results—IL-1 increased mPGE2, mGAG, and mNO concentrations in control explants without adversely affecting cell viability. Treatment with INDOsim blocked PGE2 production and increased mNO concentration in IL-1–stimulated and unstimulated explants and increased mGAG concentration in unstimulated explants. Treatment with DNsim (0.06 and 0.18 mg/mL) reduced mPGE2 concentration in IL-1–stimulated and unstimulated explants, reduced mNO concentration in IL-1–stimulated explants, and increased mNO concentration in unstimulated explants. Treatment with 0.18 mg of DNsim/mL increased cell viability in the presence of IL-1. In IL-1–stimulated explants, BOsim (0.06 and 0.18 mg/mL) reduced mPGE2 concentration, but 0.18 mg of BOsim/mL increased cell viability.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Effects of IL-1 on cartilage explants in vitro were modulated by DNsim and BOsim.

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that simulated digests of Biota orientalis (BO) and a dietary nutraceutical (DN; composed of mussel, shark cartilage, abalone, and BO seed lipid extract) inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO), and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in interleukin (IL)-1–stimulated cartilage explants.

Sample Population—Cartilage tissue from 12 pigs.

Procedures—Articular cartilage explants were conditioned with a simulated digest of BO (BOsim) or DN (DNsim) at concentrations of 0, 0.06, or 0.18 mg/mL or indomethacin (INDOsim; 0 or 0.02 mg/mL) for 72 hours. Control explants received digest vehicle only. Explants were or were not stimulated with recombinant human-IL-1β (10 or 0 ng/mL) during the final 48 hours of culture. Concentrations of PGE2, GAG, and NO in media samples (mPGE2,mGAG, and mNO concentrations, respectively) were analyzed, and explant tissue was stained fluorochromatically to determine chondrocyte viability. Treatment effects during the final 48-hour culture period were analyzed.

Results—IL-1 increased mPGE2, mGAG, and mNO concentrations in control explants without adversely affecting cell viability. Treatment with INDOsim blocked PGE2 production and increased mNO concentration in IL-1–stimulated and unstimulated explants and increased mGAG concentration in unstimulated explants. Treatment with DNsim (0.06 and 0.18 mg/mL) reduced mPGE2 concentration in IL-1–stimulated and unstimulated explants, reduced mNO concentration in IL-1–stimulated explants, and increased mNO concentration in unstimulated explants. Treatment with 0.18 mg of DNsim/mL increased cell viability in the presence of IL-1. In IL-1–stimulated explants, BOsim (0.06 and 0.18 mg/mL) reduced mPGE2 concentration, but 0.18 mg of BOsim/mL increased cell viability.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Effects of IL-1 on cartilage explants in vitro were modulated by DNsim and BOsim.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Pearson's present address is the Department of Plant Agriculture, Ontario Agriculture College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Supported by Interpath Pty Ltd, Australia.

Dr. Pearson was supported by a scholarship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC).

The study sponsor did not participate in the study design; collection, analysis, or interpretation of data; writing of the manuscript; or decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pearson.