Radiographic morphology of the cranial portion of the cervical vertebral column in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and its relationship to syringomyelia

Catherine E. Stalin Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, England.

Search for other papers by Catherine E. Stalin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MA, Vet MB
,
Clare Rusbridge Stone Lion Veterinary Centre, 41 High St, Wimbledon Village, London, SW19 5AU, England.

Search for other papers by Clare Rusbridge in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVMS
,
Nicolas Granger Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, England.
Stone Lion Veterinary Centre, 41 High St, Wimbledon Village, London, SW19 5AU, England.
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, England.

Search for other papers by Nicolas Granger in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
Nick D. Jeffery Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, England.

Search for other papers by Nick D. Jeffery in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To compare radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region between Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and dogs of other breeds and determine whether there was an association between radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region and syringomyelia in CKCSs.

Animals—65 CKCSs and 72 dogs of other breeds.

Procedures—The amount that the spinous process of the axis overlapped the dorsal arch of the atlas, the relative size of the spinous process of the axis, and the amount of widening of the atlantoaxial joint that occurred when the neck was moved from a neutral to a flexed position were measured on lateral radiographic projections of the atlantoaxial region. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to identify CKCSs with syringomyelia.

Results—The amount of overlap of the atlas and axis and the relative size of the spinous process of the axis were significantly smaller in CKCSs than in dogs of other breeds. However, the amount of widening of the atlantoaxial joint that occurred when the neck was moved from a neutral to a flexed position was not significantly different between groups, and no association was detected between syringomyelia and excessive atlantoaxial joint space widening or between syringomyelia and an excessively small axial spinous process.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region in CKCSs differs from morphology of that region in dogs of other breeds, but that these differences do not account for why some CKCSs develop syringomyelia and others do not.

Abstract

Objective—To compare radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region between Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and dogs of other breeds and determine whether there was an association between radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region and syringomyelia in CKCSs.

Animals—65 CKCSs and 72 dogs of other breeds.

Procedures—The amount that the spinous process of the axis overlapped the dorsal arch of the atlas, the relative size of the spinous process of the axis, and the amount of widening of the atlantoaxial joint that occurred when the neck was moved from a neutral to a flexed position were measured on lateral radiographic projections of the atlantoaxial region. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to identify CKCSs with syringomyelia.

Results—The amount of overlap of the atlas and axis and the relative size of the spinous process of the axis were significantly smaller in CKCSs than in dogs of other breeds. However, the amount of widening of the atlantoaxial joint that occurred when the neck was moved from a neutral to a flexed position was not significantly different between groups, and no association was detected between syringomyelia and excessive atlantoaxial joint space widening or between syringomyelia and an excessively small axial spinous process.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that radiographic morphology of the atlantoaxial region in CKCSs differs from morphology of that region in dogs of other breeds, but that these differences do not account for why some CKCSs develop syringomyelia and others do not.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 40 0 0
Full Text Views 423 253 40
PDF Downloads 78 45 4
Advertisement