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Validity of goniometric joint measurements in cats

Gayle H. JaegerCalifornia Veterinary Specialists, 100 N Rancho Santa Fe Rd, Ste 133, San Marcos, CA 92069

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Denis J. Marcellin-LittleOrthopedics Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606

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Venita DePuyBiostatistics, INC Research, 4700 Falls of Neuse Rd, Ste 400, Raleigh, NC 27609

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B. Duncan X. LascellesComparative Pain Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606

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 BVSc, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To compare and validate goniometric joint measurements obtained from nonsedated and sedated cats with measurements from radiographic evaluation.

Animals—20 adult cats with no evidence of joint disease.

Procedures—Measurements of flexion and extension of the carpus, elbow, shoulder, tarsus, stifle, and hip joints and of carpal and tarsal joints during varus and valgus angulation were made by a single investigator before and after sedation of cats. Measurements were made by use of a goniometer with a masked dial. Joint angle measurements were compared between nonsedated and sedated cats and also with measurements from radiographs made while cats were sedated. Each series of measurements was repeated 4 times. To evaluate repeatability, Cronbach α values were calculated for repeated measure results of goniometric joint measurements of nonsedated and sedated cats. An intraclass correlation was calculated to determine reliability among the 3 measurement types (ie, measurements from nonsedated and sedated cats and on radiographic evaluation).

Results—Joint measurements did not differ significantly by measurement type, when comparing radiographic measurements with goniometric measurements in sedated and nonsedated cats. Cronbach α values were > 0.99 for goniometric joint measurements within individual nonsedated and sedated cats and also for comparison of mean meaurements obtained from sedated cats versus nonsedated cats versus radiographs. An intraclass correlation of 0.999 revealed high reliability among measurement types.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that goniometric joint measurements in nonsedated and sedated cats are repeatable and valid.

Abstract

Objective—To compare and validate goniometric joint measurements obtained from nonsedated and sedated cats with measurements from radiographic evaluation.

Animals—20 adult cats with no evidence of joint disease.

Procedures—Measurements of flexion and extension of the carpus, elbow, shoulder, tarsus, stifle, and hip joints and of carpal and tarsal joints during varus and valgus angulation were made by a single investigator before and after sedation of cats. Measurements were made by use of a goniometer with a masked dial. Joint angle measurements were compared between nonsedated and sedated cats and also with measurements from radiographs made while cats were sedated. Each series of measurements was repeated 4 times. To evaluate repeatability, Cronbach α values were calculated for repeated measure results of goniometric joint measurements of nonsedated and sedated cats. An intraclass correlation was calculated to determine reliability among the 3 measurement types (ie, measurements from nonsedated and sedated cats and on radiographic evaluation).

Results—Joint measurements did not differ significantly by measurement type, when comparing radiographic measurements with goniometric measurements in sedated and nonsedated cats. Cronbach α values were > 0.99 for goniometric joint measurements within individual nonsedated and sedated cats and also for comparison of mean meaurements obtained from sedated cats versus nonsedated cats versus radiographs. An intraclass correlation of 0.999 revealed high reliability among measurement types.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that goniometric joint measurements in nonsedated and sedated cats are repeatable and valid.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Geri Wagner, Victoria Fong, and Barbara Ratterree for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Lascelles.