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Influence of three anesthetic protocols on glomerular filtration rate in dogs

Marion FusellierAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Jean-Claude DesfontisAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Stéphane MadecAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Freddy GautierAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Michelle DebailleulAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Marc GognyAnimal Pathophysiology and Functional Pharmacology Unit (UPSP 5304), National Veterinary School, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France.

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Abstract

Objective—To investigate renal function in clinically normal dogs when awake and during anesthesia with medetomidine; xylazine, ketamine, and halothane (XKH) combination; or propofol.

Animals—10 adult female Beagles.

Procedures—At intervals of 15 days, dogs were administered medetomidine (0.05 mg/kg, IV); XKH combination (xylazine [1 mg/kg, IV], ketamine [5 mg/kg, IV], and halothane [1% end-tidal concentration]); or propofol (6 mg/kg, IV) to induce anesthesia or no treatment. Glomerular filtration rate was assessed on the basis of renal uptake (RU; determined via renal scintigraphy) and plasma clearance (CL) of technetium 99m-labeled diethylenetriamine peentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA).

Results—In awake dogs, mean ± SEM RU was 9.7 ± 0.4% and CL was 3.86 ± 0.23 mL/min/ kg. Renal uptake and CL of 99mTc-DTPA were not significantly modified by administration of XKH (RU, 11.4 ± 0.9%; CL, 4.6 ± 0.32 mL/min/kg) or propofol (RU, 9.7 ± 0.3%; CL, 3.78 ± 0.37 mL/min/kg). Half-life elimination time of plasma 99mTc-DTPA decreased significantly in XKH-anesthetized dogs, compared with the value in awake dogs (14.4 minutes and 28.9 minutes, respectively). However, glomerular filtration rate was significantly decreased by administration of medetomidine (RU, 3.9 ± 0.1%), and the time to maximum kidney activity was significantly increased (867 ± 56 seconds vs 181 ± 11 seconds without anesthesia).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that anesthesia with propofol or an XKH combination did not alter renal function in healthy Beagles, but anesthesia with medetomidine decreased early RU of 99mTc-DTPA.

Abstract

Objective—To investigate renal function in clinically normal dogs when awake and during anesthesia with medetomidine; xylazine, ketamine, and halothane (XKH) combination; or propofol.

Animals—10 adult female Beagles.

Procedures—At intervals of 15 days, dogs were administered medetomidine (0.05 mg/kg, IV); XKH combination (xylazine [1 mg/kg, IV], ketamine [5 mg/kg, IV], and halothane [1% end-tidal concentration]); or propofol (6 mg/kg, IV) to induce anesthesia or no treatment. Glomerular filtration rate was assessed on the basis of renal uptake (RU; determined via renal scintigraphy) and plasma clearance (CL) of technetium 99m-labeled diethylenetriamine peentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA).

Results—In awake dogs, mean ± SEM RU was 9.7 ± 0.4% and CL was 3.86 ± 0.23 mL/min/ kg. Renal uptake and CL of 99mTc-DTPA were not significantly modified by administration of XKH (RU, 11.4 ± 0.9%; CL, 4.6 ± 0.32 mL/min/kg) or propofol (RU, 9.7 ± 0.3%; CL, 3.78 ± 0.37 mL/min/kg). Half-life elimination time of plasma 99mTc-DTPA decreased significantly in XKH-anesthetized dogs, compared with the value in awake dogs (14.4 minutes and 28.9 minutes, respectively). However, glomerular filtration rate was significantly decreased by administration of medetomidine (RU, 3.9 ± 0.1%), and the time to maximum kidney activity was significantly increased (867 ± 56 seconds vs 181 ± 11 seconds without anesthesia).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that anesthesia with propofol or an XKH combination did not alter renal function in healthy Beagles, but anesthesia with medetomidine decreased early RU of 99mTc-DTPA.

Contributor Notes

Presented in part at the 5th European Society of Laboratory Animal Veterinarians Congress, Nantes, France, June 2004.

The authors thank Françoise Coppin for radiopharmaceutical titration and Chantal Thorin for data and statistical analyses.

Address correspondence to Dr. Desfontis.