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Response of healthy dogs to infusions of human serum albumin

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  • 1 Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 2 Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 3 Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 4 Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology and the Research Animal Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
  • | 5 Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the clinical and immunologic response in healthy dogs to infusions of human serum albumin (HSA).

Animals—9 healthy purpose-bred mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was administered a 25% HSA solution once or twice. Various physical examination and laboratory variables were serially evaluated. Antibody against HSA was assayed before and after infusion by use of an ELISA. Intradermal testing was also conducted. A repeated-measures ANOVA or Friedman repeated-measures ANOVA on ranks was used to compare results for the variables.

Results—Adverse clinical reactions were observed after the first or second infusion in 3 dogs. Anaphylactoid reactions were observed in 1 of 9 dogs during the first infusion and in 2 of 2 dogs administered a second infusion. Two dogs developed severe edema and urticaria 6 or 7 days after an initial infusion. All dogs developed anti-HSA antibodies. Positive responses for ID tests were observed in 8 of 9 dogs. Short-term increases were detected in blood protein, total bilirubin, and calcium concentrations after HSA infusion. Serum cholesterol concentrations and platelet counts decreased after HSA infusion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of HSA resulted in profound reactions in 2 of 9 dogs administered a single infusion and in 2 of 2 dogs administered a second infusion. This indicates that there is risk of life-threatening adverse reactions to HSA infusion in healthy dogs.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the clinical and immunologic response in healthy dogs to infusions of human serum albumin (HSA).

Animals—9 healthy purpose-bred mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog was administered a 25% HSA solution once or twice. Various physical examination and laboratory variables were serially evaluated. Antibody against HSA was assayed before and after infusion by use of an ELISA. Intradermal testing was also conducted. A repeated-measures ANOVA or Friedman repeated-measures ANOVA on ranks was used to compare results for the variables.

Results—Adverse clinical reactions were observed after the first or second infusion in 3 dogs. Anaphylactoid reactions were observed in 1 of 9 dogs during the first infusion and in 2 of 2 dogs administered a second infusion. Two dogs developed severe edema and urticaria 6 or 7 days after an initial infusion. All dogs developed anti-HSA antibodies. Positive responses for ID tests were observed in 8 of 9 dogs. Short-term increases were detected in blood protein, total bilirubin, and calcium concentrations after HSA infusion. Serum cholesterol concentrations and platelet counts decreased after HSA infusion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of HSA resulted in profound reactions in 2 of 9 dogs administered a single infusion and in 2 of 2 dogs administered a second infusion. This indicates that there is risk of life-threatening adverse reactions to HSA infusion in healthy dogs.

Contributor Notes

Supported by a grant from the Committee on Research of the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine; a grant from the Pi Chapter, Phi Zeta, of the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine; and Heska Corporation.

Presented in part at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 24th Annual Forum, Louisville, May 2006, and at the 12th International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, San Antonio, Tex, September 2006.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cohn.