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In vitro comparison of the effects of two forms of hydroxyethyl starch solutions on platelet function in dogs

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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Departments of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of 2 hydroxyethyl starch (HES) preparations (ie, HES solution with a molecular weight of 600 kd and a degree of substitution of 0.7 [HES 600/0.7] and a calcium-containing polyionic HES solution with a molecular weight of 670 kd and a degree of substitution of 0.75 [HES 670/0.75]) on canine platelet function.

Sample Population—Blood samples from 10 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dilution of citrated whole blood was performed with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 at ratios of 1:9 (ie, 1 part saline solution or colloid to 9 parts whole blood) and 1:3. Measurements of time to platelet plug formation in a capillary tube (ie, closure time) were made by use of a bench-top platelet function analyzer with collagen and ADP platelet agonists.

Results—Mean baseline closure time was 68.0 ± 15.3 seconds. A 1:3 dilution of whole blood with saline solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 resulted in mean closure times of 85.8 ± 15.7 seconds, 100.6 ± 18.6 seconds, and 101.6 ± 16.2 seconds, respectively. Closure time following 1:3 dilution of whole blood with saline solution was significantly different from baseline and from 1:9 dilution with saline solution. Closure time following 1:3 dilution of whole blood with HES 670/0.75 was significantly different from baseline, 1:3 and 1:9 dilutions with saline solution, and 1:9 dilutions with HES 600/0.7 or HES 670/0.75.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Saline solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 affect canine platelet function by prolonging closure times; HES solutions prolonged closure time to a greater extent than saline solution.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of 2 hydroxyethyl starch (HES) preparations (ie, HES solution with a molecular weight of 600 kd and a degree of substitution of 0.7 [HES 600/0.7] and a calcium-containing polyionic HES solution with a molecular weight of 670 kd and a degree of substitution of 0.75 [HES 670/0.75]) on canine platelet function.

Sample Population—Blood samples from 10 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dilution of citrated whole blood was performed with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 at ratios of 1:9 (ie, 1 part saline solution or colloid to 9 parts whole blood) and 1:3. Measurements of time to platelet plug formation in a capillary tube (ie, closure time) were made by use of a bench-top platelet function analyzer with collagen and ADP platelet agonists.

Results—Mean baseline closure time was 68.0 ± 15.3 seconds. A 1:3 dilution of whole blood with saline solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 resulted in mean closure times of 85.8 ± 15.7 seconds, 100.6 ± 18.6 seconds, and 101.6 ± 16.2 seconds, respectively. Closure time following 1:3 dilution of whole blood with saline solution was significantly different from baseline and from 1:9 dilution with saline solution. Closure time following 1:3 dilution of whole blood with HES 670/0.75 was significantly different from baseline, 1:3 and 1:9 dilutions with saline solution, and 1:9 dilutions with HES 600/0.7 or HES 670/0.75.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Saline solution, HES 600/0.7, and HES 670/0.75 affect canine platelet function by prolonging closure times; HES solutions prolonged closure time to a greater extent than saline solution.

Contributor Notes

Presented in part at the 12th International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, San Antonio, Texas, September 2006.

Supported by the Center for Companion Animal Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Wierenga.