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Effects of food intake and food withholding on plasma ghrelin concentrations in healthy dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.
  • | 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Dr Molewaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
  • | 3 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Dr Molewaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.
  • | 5 Department of Physiology and Biometrics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 8, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
  • | 7 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Dr Molewaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
  • | 8 Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 8, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the physiologic endocrine effects of food intake and food withholding via measurement of the circulating concentrations of acylated ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), insulin–like growth factor-I (IGF-I), glucose, and insulin when food was administered at the usual time, after 1 day's withholding, after 3 days' withholding and after refeeding the next day in healthy Beagles.

Animals—9 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected from 8:30 AM to 5 PM from Beagles when food was administered as usual at 10 AM, after 1 day's withholding, after 3 days' withholding, and after refeeding at 10 AM the next day.

Results—Overall mean plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly lower when food was administered than after food withholding. Overall mean plasma GH and IGF-I concentrations did not differ significantly among the 4 periods. Circulating overall mean glucose and insulin concentrations were significantly higher after refeeding, compared with the 3 other periods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs, food withholding and food intake were associated with higher and lower circulating ghrelin concentrations, respectively, suggesting that, in dogs, ghrelin participates in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations were not associated with similar changes in plasma GH concentrations, whereas insulin and glucose concentrations appeared to change reciprocally with the ghrelin concentrations.

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the physiologic endocrine effects of food intake and food withholding via measurement of the circulating concentrations of acylated ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), insulin–like growth factor-I (IGF-I), glucose, and insulin when food was administered at the usual time, after 1 day's withholding, after 3 days' withholding and after refeeding the next day in healthy Beagles.

Animals—9 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected from 8:30 AM to 5 PM from Beagles when food was administered as usual at 10 AM, after 1 day's withholding, after 3 days' withholding, and after refeeding at 10 AM the next day.

Results—Overall mean plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly lower when food was administered than after food withholding. Overall mean plasma GH and IGF-I concentrations did not differ significantly among the 4 periods. Circulating overall mean glucose and insulin concentrations were significantly higher after refeeding, compared with the 3 other periods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs, food withholding and food intake were associated with higher and lower circulating ghrelin concentrations, respectively, suggesting that, in dogs, ghrelin participates in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations were not associated with similar changes in plasma GH concentrations, whereas insulin and glucose concentrations appeared to change reciprocally with the ghrelin concentrations.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank E. De Wolf, G. De Clercq, S. Bruggeman, J. Wolfswinkel, C.P.M. Sprang, and F. Riemers for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Bhatti.