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Accuracy of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor during phenylephrine-induced hypertension in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66503.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66503.
  • | 3 Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66503.

Abstract

Objective—To examine the agreement between direct arterial blood pressure measurements obtained from 2 arteries and indirect blood pressure measurements obtained with an oscillometric blood pressure monitor (OBPM) during normotension and phenylephrine-induced hypertension in dogs.

Animals—16 male Beagles.

Procedures—In anesthetized dogs, arterial catheters were placed in the lingual and dorsal pedal arteries for measurement of arterial blood pressure. A blood pressure cuff was placed on either the dog's fore- or hind limb and connected to an OBPM. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures (SAP, DAP, and MAP, respectively) were recorded from both arteries and the OBPM every 5 minutes for 30 minutes (baseline), during a 30-minute period in which dogs received a phenylephrine infusion IV to induce hypertension, and for 30 minutes after discontinuation of the infusion. Mean differences in blood pressure values and confidence intervals were calculated to compare the indirect and direct measurement techniques.

Results—In dogs, oscillometry underestimated SAP during normotension, and the difference between oscillometric and direct measurements increased during hypertension. Oscillometry underestimated DAP, but the difference between oscillometric and direct measurements decreased during hypertension. There was close agreement among techniques for MAP determinations. Biases between direct measurements and OPBM blood pressure values measured from dogs' forelimbs or hind limbs were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In normotensive dogs, oscillometric measurements of MAP and SAP agreed more closely with direct arterial pressure measurements than oscillometric estimates of DAP. Oscillometric measurement of MAP was accurate during both normotension and hypertension in dogs.

Abstract

Objective—To examine the agreement between direct arterial blood pressure measurements obtained from 2 arteries and indirect blood pressure measurements obtained with an oscillometric blood pressure monitor (OBPM) during normotension and phenylephrine-induced hypertension in dogs.

Animals—16 male Beagles.

Procedures—In anesthetized dogs, arterial catheters were placed in the lingual and dorsal pedal arteries for measurement of arterial blood pressure. A blood pressure cuff was placed on either the dog's fore- or hind limb and connected to an OBPM. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures (SAP, DAP, and MAP, respectively) were recorded from both arteries and the OBPM every 5 minutes for 30 minutes (baseline), during a 30-minute period in which dogs received a phenylephrine infusion IV to induce hypertension, and for 30 minutes after discontinuation of the infusion. Mean differences in blood pressure values and confidence intervals were calculated to compare the indirect and direct measurement techniques.

Results—In dogs, oscillometry underestimated SAP during normotension, and the difference between oscillometric and direct measurements increased during hypertension. Oscillometry underestimated DAP, but the difference between oscillometric and direct measurements decreased during hypertension. There was close agreement among techniques for MAP determinations. Biases between direct measurements and OPBM blood pressure values measured from dogs' forelimbs or hind limbs were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In normotensive dogs, oscillometric measurements of MAP and SAP agreed more closely with direct arterial pressure measurements than oscillometric estimates of DAP. Oscillometric measurement of MAP was accurate during both normotension and hypertension in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Stoll's present address is Veterinary Specialty Services, 1021 Howard George Dr, Manchester, MO 63021.

Address correspondence to Dr. McMurphy.