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Duration of corneal anesthesia following topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride solution in clinically normal cats

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

Abstract

Objective—To determine duration of corneal anesthesia following topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride solution in domestic shorthair (DSH) cats.

Animals—20 clinically normal DSH cats.

Procedures—Baseline corneal touch threshold (CCT) was established by use of a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer. Treatment consisted of a single 50-μL topical application of an ophthalmic preparation of 0.5% proparacaine solution to a randomly selected eye of each cat. The corneal touch threshold was assessed 1 and 5 minutes after application to the cornea and at 5- minute intervals thereafter for 60 minutes.

Results—Corneal sensitivity, as determined by Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometry, was significantly reduced from baseline for 25 minutes following topical administration of ophthalmic proparacaine. Maximal anesthetic effect lasted 5 minutes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—As determined by Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometry, duration of anesthetic effects on the cornea induced by a single topical application of an ophthalmic preparation of 0.5% proparacaine solution in DSH cats is considerably shorter than the reported duration of corneal anesthesia in dogs.

Abstract

Objective—To determine duration of corneal anesthesia following topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride solution in domestic shorthair (DSH) cats.

Animals—20 clinically normal DSH cats.

Procedures—Baseline corneal touch threshold (CCT) was established by use of a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer. Treatment consisted of a single 50-μL topical application of an ophthalmic preparation of 0.5% proparacaine solution to a randomly selected eye of each cat. The corneal touch threshold was assessed 1 and 5 minutes after application to the cornea and at 5- minute intervals thereafter for 60 minutes.

Results—Corneal sensitivity, as determined by Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometry, was significantly reduced from baseline for 25 minutes following topical administration of ophthalmic proparacaine. Maximal anesthetic effect lasted 5 minutes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—As determined by Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometry, duration of anesthetic effects on the cornea induced by a single topical application of an ophthalmic preparation of 0.5% proparacaine solution in DSH cats is considerably shorter than the reported duration of corneal anesthesia in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Presented in part at the 36th Annual Meeting of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists, Nashville, Tenn, October 2005.

The authors thank Ellen Binder and Heather Johnston for technical assistance and Daniel Ward and Stephen Werre for help with statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Herring.