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Comparison of mesenteric lymphadenography performed via surgical and laparoscopic approaches in dogs

Brigitte A. Brisson DMV, DVSc1, David L. Holmberg DVM, MVSc2, and M. House DVM1,2
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether injection of a mesenteric lymph node with iodinated aqueous contrast medium results in radiographic delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches, ascertain the ideal interval between injection and radiographic imaging, and evaluate mesenteric lymphadenography performed via laparoscopic and surgical approaches in dogs.

Animals—10 adult dogs.

Procedure—In each dog, a right paracostal laparotomy or a right laparoscopic approach was performed to identify a mesenteric lymph node for injection of an iodinated aqueous contrast agent (0.22 mL/kg [81.4 mg of iodine/kg]). Lateral radiographic views were obtained at 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 seconds after injection.

Results—A mesenteric lymph node was identified and injected with contrast medium in each dog. Via paracostal laparotomy, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangiographic evaluation in 4 of 5 dogs, whereas via the laparoscopic approach, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangio-graphic evaluation in 2 of 5 dogs. In successful radiographic evaluations, injected lymph nodes, mesenteric lymphatics, and the thoracic duct and its branches were delineated. Radiographs obtained at 60 and 120 seconds after injection of contrast medium provided the most detail.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Injection of a mesenteric lymph node directly with contrast medium appears to be a feasible technique for delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches in dogs and might be useful in small animals in which mesenteric lymphatic catheterization can be difficult and lymphangiography is more likely to fail. Refinement of the laparoscopic technique may provide a minimally invasive approach to lymphadenography.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether injection of a mesenteric lymph node with iodinated aqueous contrast medium results in radiographic delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches, ascertain the ideal interval between injection and radiographic imaging, and evaluate mesenteric lymphadenography performed via laparoscopic and surgical approaches in dogs.

Animals—10 adult dogs.

Procedure—In each dog, a right paracostal laparotomy or a right laparoscopic approach was performed to identify a mesenteric lymph node for injection of an iodinated aqueous contrast agent (0.22 mL/kg [81.4 mg of iodine/kg]). Lateral radiographic views were obtained at 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 seconds after injection.

Results—A mesenteric lymph node was identified and injected with contrast medium in each dog. Via paracostal laparotomy, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangiographic evaluation in 4 of 5 dogs, whereas via the laparoscopic approach, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangio-graphic evaluation in 2 of 5 dogs. In successful radiographic evaluations, injected lymph nodes, mesenteric lymphatics, and the thoracic duct and its branches were delineated. Radiographs obtained at 60 and 120 seconds after injection of contrast medium provided the most detail.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Injection of a mesenteric lymph node directly with contrast medium appears to be a feasible technique for delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches in dogs and might be useful in small animals in which mesenteric lymphatic catheterization can be difficult and lymphangiography is more likely to fail. Refinement of the laparoscopic technique may provide a minimally invasive approach to lymphadenography.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Brisson.

Dr. House's present address is Long Island Veterinary Specialists, 163 South Service Rd, Plainview, NY 11803.

Supported by the Ontario Veterinary College Pet Trust.

Presented at the 13th Annual Scientific Meeting of the European College of Veterinary Surgeons, Prague, July 2004.