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Comparison of measured oxyhemoglobin saturation and oxygen content with analyzer-calculated values and hand-calculated values obtained in unsedated healthy dogs

Nancy E. ScottVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Steve C. HaskinsDepartment of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Janet AldrichVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Marlis RezendeVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Ryan M. GallagherVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Matthew M. HendersonVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare direct measurements of canine oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation and blood oxygen content (ContO2) in healthy dogs with analyzer-calculated values derived by use of a human HbO2 relationship and with hand-calculated values derived by use of a canine HbO2 relationship.

Animals—17 healthy dogs.

Procedure—3-mL samples of heparinized arterial and jugular venous blood were collected from each dog. The pH, PCO2, PO2, hemoglobin, HbO2, carboxyhemoglobin, methemoglobin, and ContO2 were measured; HbO2 and ContO2 were calculated automatically by analyzers and also hand-calculated. Blood gas analyzer–calculated and hand-calculated HbO2 values were compared with co-oximeter–measured HbO2 values. Analyzer-calculated and hand-calculated ContO2 values were compared with oxygen content analyzermeasured values.

Results—Hand-calculated HbO2 values for arterial and jugular venous samples were slightly but significantly lower than those calculated by a blood gas analyzer or obtained from a co-oximeter. Hand-calculated and analyzer-calculated arterial and venous ContO2 were similar to measured values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although certain HbO2 and ContO2 values generated by use of the different methods were significantly different, these differences are unlikely to be clinically important in healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1273–1277)

Abstract

Objective—To compare direct measurements of canine oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation and blood oxygen content (ContO2) in healthy dogs with analyzer-calculated values derived by use of a human HbO2 relationship and with hand-calculated values derived by use of a canine HbO2 relationship.

Animals—17 healthy dogs.

Procedure—3-mL samples of heparinized arterial and jugular venous blood were collected from each dog. The pH, PCO2, PO2, hemoglobin, HbO2, carboxyhemoglobin, methemoglobin, and ContO2 were measured; HbO2 and ContO2 were calculated automatically by analyzers and also hand-calculated. Blood gas analyzer–calculated and hand-calculated HbO2 values were compared with co-oximeter–measured HbO2 values. Analyzer-calculated and hand-calculated ContO2 values were compared with oxygen content analyzermeasured values.

Results—Hand-calculated HbO2 values for arterial and jugular venous samples were slightly but significantly lower than those calculated by a blood gas analyzer or obtained from a co-oximeter. Hand-calculated and analyzer-calculated arterial and venous ContO2 were similar to measured values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although certain HbO2 and ContO2 values generated by use of the different methods were significantly different, these differences are unlikely to be clinically important in healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1273–1277)