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Effects of aerosolized class C fly ash in weanling goats

Charles W. PurdyUSDA, Agricultural Research Science, Conservation, and Production Research Laboratory, PO Drawer 10, Bushland, TX 79012.

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 DVM, PhD
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David C. StrausDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430.

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J. R. AyersVeterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Texas A&M University, Amarillo, TX 79106.
Present address is the Veterinary Diagnostic Center, Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of repeated aerosol exposures to fly ash dust on respiratory tracts of tent-confined goats.

Animals—12 weanling Boer-Spanish crossbred goats.

Procedure—Goats were randomly assigned to 2 groups: fly ash treatment group (principal goats, n = 6) or control group (control goats, 6). Aerosolized fly ash dust was provided during a 4-hour period for each of 6 applications given over 3 months and one 2-hour application prior to necropsy. Fly ash particle diameters ranged from 0.1 to 130 µm and averaged 17.8 µm, with 1.5% of fly ash particles in the 0.1- to 5-µm-diameter range. A mean ± SD of 748 ± 152 g/treatment was delivered inside a tent containing principal goats; control goats were placed inside a similar tent for 4-hour treatments without dust. Following treatment, rectal temperatures were taken at 0, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 72 hours; Hcts were recorded at 0, 24, and 72 hours.

Results—Rectal temperatures were significantly increased at 4, 6, and 8 hours and decreased at 72 hours, compared with 0 hours. Mean ± SEM Hct values were significantly increased for principal goats (37.47 ± 0.39%), compared with control goats (36.17 ± 0.42%). A significant increase in the mean area of gross atelectatic lung lesions (1,410 mm2) was found in principal goats (n = 6), compared with control goats (440 mm2; 5).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An increase in atelectatic lung lesions was observed in principal goats, compared with control goats; however, overall, fly ash dust effects were nontoxic. ( Am J Vet Res 2005;66:991–995)

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of repeated aerosol exposures to fly ash dust on respiratory tracts of tent-confined goats.

Animals—12 weanling Boer-Spanish crossbred goats.

Procedure—Goats were randomly assigned to 2 groups: fly ash treatment group (principal goats, n = 6) or control group (control goats, 6). Aerosolized fly ash dust was provided during a 4-hour period for each of 6 applications given over 3 months and one 2-hour application prior to necropsy. Fly ash particle diameters ranged from 0.1 to 130 µm and averaged 17.8 µm, with 1.5% of fly ash particles in the 0.1- to 5-µm-diameter range. A mean ± SD of 748 ± 152 g/treatment was delivered inside a tent containing principal goats; control goats were placed inside a similar tent for 4-hour treatments without dust. Following treatment, rectal temperatures were taken at 0, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 72 hours; Hcts were recorded at 0, 24, and 72 hours.

Results—Rectal temperatures were significantly increased at 4, 6, and 8 hours and decreased at 72 hours, compared with 0 hours. Mean ± SEM Hct values were significantly increased for principal goats (37.47 ± 0.39%), compared with control goats (36.17 ± 0.42%). A significant increase in the mean area of gross atelectatic lung lesions (1,410 mm2) was found in principal goats (n = 6), compared with control goats (440 mm2; 5).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An increase in atelectatic lung lesions was observed in principal goats, compared with control goats; however, overall, fly ash dust effects were nontoxic. ( Am J Vet Res 2005;66:991–995)