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Evaluation of assays for perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease

Karin Allenspach Dr med vet1, Nicole Luckschander Dr med vet2, Maya Styner Dr med3, Frank Seibold PD, Dr med4, Marcus Doherr PD, Dr med vet, PhD5, D. Aeschbach med vet6, and Frédéric Gaschen Prof Dr med vet7
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 3 Department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Division of Gastrointestinal Diseases, Inselspital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 4 Department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Division of Gastrointestinal Diseases, Inselspital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of immunofluorescence asssays for perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCAs) and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCAs) in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and assess the clinical value of these serologic markers of the disease.

Animals—39 dogs with IBD, 18 dogs with acute diarrhea, 19 dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea, 26 healthy dogs of various breeds and age, and 22 healthy young working dogs.

Procedure—Sera obtained from the dogs in each group were added to canine granulocyte- and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-mounted slides for detection of pANCAs and ASCAs via immunofluorescence techniques. Sensitivity and specificity (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were calculated for the group of dogs with IBD versus each of the 2 groups of healthy dogs, the group of dogs with acute diarrhea, and the group of dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea.

Results—Among the 39 dogs with IBD, 20 yielded positive results via the pANCA assay (sensitivity, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.35 to 0.67]) and 17 yielded positive results via the ASCA assay (sensitivity, 0.44 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.69]). The specificity of the pANCA assay in the 4 groups of non–IBD-affected dogs ranged from 0.83 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.72 to 1.00).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Immunofluorescence assays for pANCA and ASCA appear to be useful for the detection of IBD in dogs. The pANCA immunofluorescence assay had high specificity for canine IBD, and pANCAs appear to be accurate markers of intestinal inflammation. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1279–1283)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of immunofluorescence asssays for perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCAs) and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCAs) in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and assess the clinical value of these serologic markers of the disease.

Animals—39 dogs with IBD, 18 dogs with acute diarrhea, 19 dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea, 26 healthy dogs of various breeds and age, and 22 healthy young working dogs.

Procedure—Sera obtained from the dogs in each group were added to canine granulocyte- and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-mounted slides for detection of pANCAs and ASCAs via immunofluorescence techniques. Sensitivity and specificity (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were calculated for the group of dogs with IBD versus each of the 2 groups of healthy dogs, the group of dogs with acute diarrhea, and the group of dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea.

Results—Among the 39 dogs with IBD, 20 yielded positive results via the pANCA assay (sensitivity, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.35 to 0.67]) and 17 yielded positive results via the ASCA assay (sensitivity, 0.44 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.69]). The specificity of the pANCA assay in the 4 groups of non–IBD-affected dogs ranged from 0.83 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.72 to 1.00).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Immunofluorescence assays for pANCA and ASCA appear to be useful for the detection of IBD in dogs. The pANCA immunofluorescence assay had high specificity for canine IBD, and pANCAs appear to be accurate markers of intestinal inflammation. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1279–1283)