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Distribution of mRNA that codes for 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy cows

Mireille MeylanClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.

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Teodora M. GeorgievaClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.
Present address is the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Thrakia University, 6000 Stara Zagora, Bulgaria.

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Martin ReistClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.
Present address is the Swiss Federal Veterinary Office, Monitoring, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland.

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Jürg W. BlumDivision of Nutrition and Physiology, Institute of Animal Genetics, Nutrition and Physiology, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.

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Johannes MartigClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.

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Ivan P. GeorgievClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.
Present address is the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Thrakia University, 6000 Stara Zagora, Bulgaria.

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Adrian SteinerClinic for Ruminants, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of Berne, Bremgartenstrasse 109a, PO Box 8466, 3001 Berne, Switzerland.

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Abstract

Objective—To describe the distribution of mRNA that codes for 8 subtypes of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors (5-HTRs) in the digestive tract of dairy cows.

Sample Population—Fresh full-thickness wall specimens from the abomasum (fundus, corpus, and antrum), ileum, cecum, proximal loop of ascending colon, and 4 locations of the spiral colon collected from 10 healthy cows at slaughter.

Procedure—Concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTR subtypes (5-HTR1A, 5-HTR1B, 5-HTR1D, 5-HTR1F, 5-HTR2A, 5-HTR2B, 5-HTR2C, and 5-HTR4) in the bovine digestive tract were measured by use of a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. Results were reported in relation to mRNA expression of the housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

Results—Mean relative mRNA concentrations for 5-HTR were low (range, 0% to 1.32% of GAPDH), and mRNA that codes for 5-HTR1A was not detected. In the abomasum, mRNA expression was highest for 5-HTR1B and 5-HTR2B, followed by subtypes 1F, 2A, 1D, and 4, whereas 5-HTR2C was not detected. In intestinal samples, concentrations of subtypes 1B, 2B, and 4 were highest, followed by 1D, 1F, 2A, and 2C. Relative concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTR2A were significantly higher in the abomasum than the intestines, but lower for 5-HTR2B, 5-HTR2C, and 5-HTR4.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Relative concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTRs differ among locations in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. Understanding differences in the distribution of 5- HTRs in healthy cattle and cattle with gastrointestinal tract disease may lead to improved therapeutic approaches for abomasal and cecal motility disorders. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1151–1158)

Abstract

Objective—To describe the distribution of mRNA that codes for 8 subtypes of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors (5-HTRs) in the digestive tract of dairy cows.

Sample Population—Fresh full-thickness wall specimens from the abomasum (fundus, corpus, and antrum), ileum, cecum, proximal loop of ascending colon, and 4 locations of the spiral colon collected from 10 healthy cows at slaughter.

Procedure—Concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTR subtypes (5-HTR1A, 5-HTR1B, 5-HTR1D, 5-HTR1F, 5-HTR2A, 5-HTR2B, 5-HTR2C, and 5-HTR4) in the bovine digestive tract were measured by use of a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. Results were reported in relation to mRNA expression of the housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

Results—Mean relative mRNA concentrations for 5-HTR were low (range, 0% to 1.32% of GAPDH), and mRNA that codes for 5-HTR1A was not detected. In the abomasum, mRNA expression was highest for 5-HTR1B and 5-HTR2B, followed by subtypes 1F, 2A, 1D, and 4, whereas 5-HTR2C was not detected. In intestinal samples, concentrations of subtypes 1B, 2B, and 4 were highest, followed by 1D, 1F, 2A, and 2C. Relative concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTR2A were significantly higher in the abomasum than the intestines, but lower for 5-HTR2B, 5-HTR2C, and 5-HTR4.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Relative concentrations of mRNA that code for 5-HTRs differ among locations in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. Understanding differences in the distribution of 5- HTRs in healthy cattle and cattle with gastrointestinal tract disease may lead to improved therapeutic approaches for abomasal and cecal motility disorders. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1151–1158)