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Investigation of the effect of acepromazine on intravenous glucose tolerance tests in dogs

Viorica IonutDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033.

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Erlinda L. KirkmanDepartment of Animal Resources, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033.

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Richard N. BergmanDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033.

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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of administration of acepromazine on IV glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) in dogs.

Animals—8 male mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—With a 1-week interval between tests, each dog underwent (in random order) an IVGTT with or without pretest administration of acepromazine maleate (0.1 mg/kg, SC, 30 minutes prior to the start of the IVGTT). Food was withheld from the dogs for 14 hours prior to each test. Blood samples were obtained at 20, 10, and 1 minute prior to and at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, 22, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 120, 140, 160, and 180 minutes after administration of glucose.

Results—There were no significant differences in the baseline (ie, after food was withheld) plasma glucose, lactate, and insulin concentrations between dogs undergoing the IVGTT and acepromazine-IVGTT; however, lower baseline free fatty acid concentration was observed in acepromazine-treated dogs. Analysis of data via the application of Bergman's minimal model of glucose kinetics revealed no differences in insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response to glucose, disposition index, or glucose effectiveness between dogs treated or not treated with acepromazine before testing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that in dogs undergoing IV glucose tolerance testing, pretest administration of small doses of acepromazine can be used as a means of chemical restraint without interfering with results of the glucose metabolism assessment. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1124–1127)

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of administration of acepromazine on IV glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) in dogs.

Animals—8 male mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—With a 1-week interval between tests, each dog underwent (in random order) an IVGTT with or without pretest administration of acepromazine maleate (0.1 mg/kg, SC, 30 minutes prior to the start of the IVGTT). Food was withheld from the dogs for 14 hours prior to each test. Blood samples were obtained at 20, 10, and 1 minute prior to and at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, 22, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 120, 140, 160, and 180 minutes after administration of glucose.

Results—There were no significant differences in the baseline (ie, after food was withheld) plasma glucose, lactate, and insulin concentrations between dogs undergoing the IVGTT and acepromazine-IVGTT; however, lower baseline free fatty acid concentration was observed in acepromazine-treated dogs. Analysis of data via the application of Bergman's minimal model of glucose kinetics revealed no differences in insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response to glucose, disposition index, or glucose effectiveness between dogs treated or not treated with acepromazine before testing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that in dogs undergoing IV glucose tolerance testing, pretest administration of small doses of acepromazine can be used as a means of chemical restraint without interfering with results of the glucose metabolism assessment. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1124–1127)