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Comparison of two laparoscopic treatments for experimentally induced abdominal adhesions in pony foals

Jennifer L. Lansdowne DVM, MS1,2, Ludovic P. Bouré DMV, MS, DES3, Simon G. Pearce BVSc, PhD4,5, Carolyn L. Kerr DVM, DVSc, PhD6, and Jeff L. Caswell DVM, PhD7
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 2 Present address is James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1620.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 5 Present address is Faculty of Veterinary Science, University Veterinary Centre Sydney, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, NSW 2006.
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 7 Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.

Abstract

Objective—To compare laparoscopic dissection withlaparoscopic dissection combined with abdominal instillation of ferric hyaluronate gel for the treatment of experimentally induced adhesions in pony foals.

Animals—12 healthy pony foals.

Procedure—A serosal abrasion method was used to create adhesions at 4 sites on the jejunum (day 0). At day 7, laparoscopy was performed and the adhesions observed in each foal were recorded. In group-1 foals (n = 6), the adhesions were separated laparoscopically (treatment 1). In group-2 foals (n = 6), 300 mL of 0.5% ferric hyaluronate gel was infused into the abdomen after the adhesions were separated laparoscopically (treatment 2). At day 24, terminal laparoscopy was performed and the adhesions observed were recorded. Total number of adhesions within each group was compared between day 7 and 24. Data were analyzed to determine whether an association existed between the number of adhesions on day 24 and treatment type.

Results—At day 24, the number of adhesions was significantly decreased within each group, compared with the number of adhesions at day 7 (group-1 foals, 10 vs 22 adhesions; group-2 foals, 3 vs 20 adhesions). Treatment 1 was associated with a significantly higher number of adhesions at day 24, compared with treatment 2 (odds ratio, 4.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 23.02).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Abdominal instillation of 0.5% ferric hyaluronate gel after laparoscopic dissection was a more effective technique than laparoscopic dissection alone to treat experimentally induced adhesions in pony foals. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis following abdominal surgery in foals is a safe and effective technique. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:681–686)

Abstract

Objective—To compare laparoscopic dissection withlaparoscopic dissection combined with abdominal instillation of ferric hyaluronate gel for the treatment of experimentally induced adhesions in pony foals.

Animals—12 healthy pony foals.

Procedure—A serosal abrasion method was used to create adhesions at 4 sites on the jejunum (day 0). At day 7, laparoscopy was performed and the adhesions observed in each foal were recorded. In group-1 foals (n = 6), the adhesions were separated laparoscopically (treatment 1). In group-2 foals (n = 6), 300 mL of 0.5% ferric hyaluronate gel was infused into the abdomen after the adhesions were separated laparoscopically (treatment 2). At day 24, terminal laparoscopy was performed and the adhesions observed were recorded. Total number of adhesions within each group was compared between day 7 and 24. Data were analyzed to determine whether an association existed between the number of adhesions on day 24 and treatment type.

Results—At day 24, the number of adhesions was significantly decreased within each group, compared with the number of adhesions at day 7 (group-1 foals, 10 vs 22 adhesions; group-2 foals, 3 vs 20 adhesions). Treatment 1 was associated with a significantly higher number of adhesions at day 24, compared with treatment 2 (odds ratio, 4.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 23.02).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Abdominal instillation of 0.5% ferric hyaluronate gel after laparoscopic dissection was a more effective technique than laparoscopic dissection alone to treat experimentally induced adhesions in pony foals. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis following abdominal surgery in foals is a safe and effective technique. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:681–686)