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In vivo investigation of the efficacy of a customized solution to attenuate injury following low-flow ischemia and reperfusion injury in the jejunum of horses

Linda M. Van Hoogmoed DVM, PhD1, Jorge E. Nieto MVZ2, Sharon J. Spier DVM, PhD3, and Jack R. Snyder DVM, PhD4
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  • 1 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy of a customized solution to attenuate intestinal injury following 20% low-flow ischemia and reperfusion in the jejunum of horses.

Animals—10 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Two 30.5-cm-long segments of jejunum were exteriorized through a ventral midline incision and the mesenteric artery and vein supplying that portion of the intestine were instrumented with flow probes. Blood flow was decreased to 20% of baseline for 90 minutes followed by 90 minutes of reperfusion. In 5 horses, 60 mL of the customized solution was placed in the lumen of each segment (treatment-group horses), and 60 mL of lactated Ringer's solution was placed in the lumen of 5 additional horses (control-group horses). Biopsy specimens were obtained from 1 segment in both groups for histologic evaluation. Aliquots of luminal fluid were obtained from the other segment in both groups for determination of albumin concentrations as an index of mucosal permeability.

Results—Compared with control-group horses, treatment-group horses had a significant decrease in luminal albumin concentration following reperfusion. Although differences in mucosal grades were not significantly different between control- and treatment-group horses, treatment-group horses had significantly greater jejunal villous length and area, compared with that of control-group horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intraluminal administration of the customized solution in the jejunum, compared with lactated Ringer's solution, results in an improvement in histologic findings and mucosal translocation of albumin in horses with mild intestinal injury. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:485–490)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy of a customized solution to attenuate intestinal injury following 20% low-flow ischemia and reperfusion in the jejunum of horses.

Animals—10 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Two 30.5-cm-long segments of jejunum were exteriorized through a ventral midline incision and the mesenteric artery and vein supplying that portion of the intestine were instrumented with flow probes. Blood flow was decreased to 20% of baseline for 90 minutes followed by 90 minutes of reperfusion. In 5 horses, 60 mL of the customized solution was placed in the lumen of each segment (treatment-group horses), and 60 mL of lactated Ringer's solution was placed in the lumen of 5 additional horses (control-group horses). Biopsy specimens were obtained from 1 segment in both groups for histologic evaluation. Aliquots of luminal fluid were obtained from the other segment in both groups for determination of albumin concentrations as an index of mucosal permeability.

Results—Compared with control-group horses, treatment-group horses had a significant decrease in luminal albumin concentration following reperfusion. Although differences in mucosal grades were not significantly different between control- and treatment-group horses, treatment-group horses had significantly greater jejunal villous length and area, compared with that of control-group horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intraluminal administration of the customized solution in the jejunum, compared with lactated Ringer's solution, results in an improvement in histologic findings and mucosal translocation of albumin in horses with mild intestinal injury. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:485–490)