Effects of intracameral injection of preservative-free lidocaine on the anterior segment of the eyes in dogs

Paul A. Gerding Jr Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Terri L. Turner Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Ralph E. Hamor Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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David J. Schaeffer Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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 PhD

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% and 2% lidocaine hydrochloride solution on the anterior segment of the eyes in dogs.

Animals—16 adult healthy dogs (8 male and 8 female) judged to be free of ocular disease.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 8 dogs each. Group 1 dogs received an intracameral injection of 0.10 mL of preservative-free 1% lidocaine solution in the designated eye, and group 2 dogs received 0.10 mL of preservative-free 2% lidocaine solution in the designated eye. After injection, intraocular pressure was measured every 12 hours for 48 hours and then every 24 hours until 168 hours after injection. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy was performed preceding intracameral injection, 8 hours after injection, and then every 24 hours until 168 hours after injection. Ultrasonic pachymetry and specular microscopy were performed preceding intracameral injection and 72 and 168 hours after injection. Corneal thickness and endothelial cell density and morphology were compared with baseline measurements.

Results—No significant differences were found in intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, endothelial cell density, and morphologic features in either group, compared with baseline. A significant difference in aqueous flare was found for treated and control eyes 8, 24, and 48 hours after injection, compared with baseline. No significant difference in aqueous flare was found between treated and control eyes within either group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No adverse ocular effects were detected after intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% or 2% lidocaine solution; thus, its use would be safe for intraocular pain management in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1325–1330)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% and 2% lidocaine hydrochloride solution on the anterior segment of the eyes in dogs.

Animals—16 adult healthy dogs (8 male and 8 female) judged to be free of ocular disease.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 8 dogs each. Group 1 dogs received an intracameral injection of 0.10 mL of preservative-free 1% lidocaine solution in the designated eye, and group 2 dogs received 0.10 mL of preservative-free 2% lidocaine solution in the designated eye. After injection, intraocular pressure was measured every 12 hours for 48 hours and then every 24 hours until 168 hours after injection. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy was performed preceding intracameral injection, 8 hours after injection, and then every 24 hours until 168 hours after injection. Ultrasonic pachymetry and specular microscopy were performed preceding intracameral injection and 72 and 168 hours after injection. Corneal thickness and endothelial cell density and morphology were compared with baseline measurements.

Results—No significant differences were found in intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, endothelial cell density, and morphologic features in either group, compared with baseline. A significant difference in aqueous flare was found for treated and control eyes 8, 24, and 48 hours after injection, compared with baseline. No significant difference in aqueous flare was found between treated and control eyes within either group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No adverse ocular effects were detected after intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% or 2% lidocaine solution; thus, its use would be safe for intraocular pain management in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1325–1330)

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