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Serum concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol in clinically normal dogs and dogs with acute and chronic renal failure

Bernhard GerberClinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zürich, interthurstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

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Michael HässigDepartment of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zürich, interthurstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

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Claudia E. ReuschClinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zürich, interthurstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare serum concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-[OH]2D3) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-[OH]D3) in healthy control dogs and dogs with naturally occurring acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).

Animals—24 control dogs, 10 dogs with ARF, and 40 dogs with CRF.

Procedure—Serum concentrations of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were measured by use of a quantitative radioimmunoassay, and serum concentrations of 25- (OH)D3 were measured by use of a protein-binding assay.

Results—Mean ± SD serum concentration of 1,25- (OH)2D3 was 153 ± 50 pmol/L in control dogs, 75 ± 25 pmol/L in dogs with ARF, and 93 ± 67 pmol/L in dogs with CRF. The concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 did not differ significantly between dogs with ARF and those with CRF and was in the reference range in most dogs; however, the concentration was significantly lower in dogs with ARF or CRF, compared with the concentration in control dogs. Mean ± SD concentration of 25-(OH)D3 was 267 ± 97 nmol/L in control dogs, 130 ± 82 nmol/L in dogs with ARF, and 84 ± 60 nmol/L in dogs with CRF. The concentration of 25- (OH)D3 was significantly lower in dogs with ARF or CRF, compared with the concentration in control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was within the reference range in most dogs with renal failure. Increased serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone indicated a relative deficiency of 1,25-(OH)2D3. A decrease in the serum concentration of 25-(OH)D3 in dogs with CRF appeared to be attributable to reduced intake and increased urinary loss. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1161–1166)

Abstract

Objective—To compare serum concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-[OH]2D3) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-[OH]D3) in healthy control dogs and dogs with naturally occurring acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).

Animals—24 control dogs, 10 dogs with ARF, and 40 dogs with CRF.

Procedure—Serum concentrations of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were measured by use of a quantitative radioimmunoassay, and serum concentrations of 25- (OH)D3 were measured by use of a protein-binding assay.

Results—Mean ± SD serum concentration of 1,25- (OH)2D3 was 153 ± 50 pmol/L in control dogs, 75 ± 25 pmol/L in dogs with ARF, and 93 ± 67 pmol/L in dogs with CRF. The concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 did not differ significantly between dogs with ARF and those with CRF and was in the reference range in most dogs; however, the concentration was significantly lower in dogs with ARF or CRF, compared with the concentration in control dogs. Mean ± SD concentration of 25-(OH)D3 was 267 ± 97 nmol/L in control dogs, 130 ± 82 nmol/L in dogs with ARF, and 84 ± 60 nmol/L in dogs with CRF. The concentration of 25- (OH)D3 was significantly lower in dogs with ARF or CRF, compared with the concentration in control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was within the reference range in most dogs with renal failure. Increased serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone indicated a relative deficiency of 1,25-(OH)2D3. A decrease in the serum concentration of 25-(OH)D3 in dogs with CRF appeared to be attributable to reduced intake and increased urinary loss. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1161–1166)