Serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins in dogs with leishmaniosis during short-term treatment

Silvia Martínez-Subiela Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.

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Luis J. Bernal Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.

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José J. Cerón Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins in dogs with leishmaniosis during short-term therapy in accordance with 2 treatment protocols and determine whether concentrations of acute-phase proteins could be used to monitor the initial response of dogs to treatment.

Animals—12 dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated into 2 groups. Dogs of group 1 were treated by use of meglumine antimonate (100 mg/kg, SC, q 24 h) administered concurrently with allopurinol (15 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 20 days and then with allopurinol alone at the same dosage for the subsequent 30 days. Dogs of group 2 were treated by administration of allopurinol alone (15 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 60 days). Blood samples were obtained before and during treatment for measurement of serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins and determination of CBC counts, serum biochemical analyses, and electropherograms.

Results—All dogs evaluated in the study had increased concentrations of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, and ceruloplasmin at the time of diagnosis of leishmaniosis. Mean concentration of serum amyloid A before treatment was also increased, but some of the dogs had concentrations of serum amyloid A that were within the reference range. Concentrations of C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin decreased significantly in all dogs at the end of the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Measurement of concentrations of selected acute-phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein or ceruloplasmin, could be used to evaluate the initial response of dogs with leishmaniosis to treatment. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:102–1026)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins in dogs with leishmaniosis during short-term therapy in accordance with 2 treatment protocols and determine whether concentrations of acute-phase proteins could be used to monitor the initial response of dogs to treatment.

Animals—12 dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated into 2 groups. Dogs of group 1 were treated by use of meglumine antimonate (100 mg/kg, SC, q 24 h) administered concurrently with allopurinol (15 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 20 days and then with allopurinol alone at the same dosage for the subsequent 30 days. Dogs of group 2 were treated by administration of allopurinol alone (15 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 60 days). Blood samples were obtained before and during treatment for measurement of serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins and determination of CBC counts, serum biochemical analyses, and electropherograms.

Results—All dogs evaluated in the study had increased concentrations of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, and ceruloplasmin at the time of diagnosis of leishmaniosis. Mean concentration of serum amyloid A before treatment was also increased, but some of the dogs had concentrations of serum amyloid A that were within the reference range. Concentrations of C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin decreased significantly in all dogs at the end of the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Measurement of concentrations of selected acute-phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein or ceruloplasmin, could be used to evaluate the initial response of dogs with leishmaniosis to treatment. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:102–1026)

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