Advertisement

Effect of variable-dose propofol alone and in combination with two fixed doses of ketamine for total intravenous anesthesia in cats

Jan E. Ilkiw BVSc, PhD1, Peter J. Pascoe BVSc2, and Linda D. Tripp BS3
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the minimum infusion rate (MIR50) for propofol alone and in combination with ketamine required to attenuate reflexes commonly used in the assessment of anesthetic depth in cats.

Animals—6 cats.

Procedure—Propofol infusion started at 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg/min for propofol alone or 0.025 mg/kg/min for propofol and ketamine (low-dose [LD] constant rate infusion [CRI] of 23 µg/kg/min or high-dose [HD] CRI of 46 µg/kg/min), and after 15 minutes, responses of different reflexes were tested. Following a response, the propofol dose was increased by 0.05 mg/kg/min for propofol alone or 0.025 mg/kg/min for propofol and ketamine, and after 15 minutes, reflexes were retested.

Results—The MIR50 for propofol alone required to attenuate blinking in response to touching the medial canthus or eyelashes; swallowing in response to placement of a finger or laryngoscope in the pharynx; and to toe pinch, tetanus, and tail-clamp stimuli were determined. Addition of LD ketamine to propofol significantly decreased MIR50, compared with propofol alone, for medial canthus, eyelash, finger, toe pinch, and tetanus stimuli but did not change those for laryngoscope or tail-clamp stimuli. Addition of HD ketamine to propofol significantly decreased MIR50, compared with propofol alone, for medial canthus, eyelash, toe pinch, tetanus, and tail-clamp stimuli but did not change finger or laryngoscope responses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Propofol alone or combined with ketamine may be used for total IV anesthesia in healthy cats at the infusion rates determined in this study for attenuation of specific reflex activity. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:907–912)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the minimum infusion rate (MIR50) for propofol alone and in combination with ketamine required to attenuate reflexes commonly used in the assessment of anesthetic depth in cats.

Animals—6 cats.

Procedure—Propofol infusion started at 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg/min for propofol alone or 0.025 mg/kg/min for propofol and ketamine (low-dose [LD] constant rate infusion [CRI] of 23 µg/kg/min or high-dose [HD] CRI of 46 µg/kg/min), and after 15 minutes, responses of different reflexes were tested. Following a response, the propofol dose was increased by 0.05 mg/kg/min for propofol alone or 0.025 mg/kg/min for propofol and ketamine, and after 15 minutes, reflexes were retested.

Results—The MIR50 for propofol alone required to attenuate blinking in response to touching the medial canthus or eyelashes; swallowing in response to placement of a finger or laryngoscope in the pharynx; and to toe pinch, tetanus, and tail-clamp stimuli were determined. Addition of LD ketamine to propofol significantly decreased MIR50, compared with propofol alone, for medial canthus, eyelash, finger, toe pinch, and tetanus stimuli but did not change those for laryngoscope or tail-clamp stimuli. Addition of HD ketamine to propofol significantly decreased MIR50, compared with propofol alone, for medial canthus, eyelash, toe pinch, tetanus, and tail-clamp stimuli but did not change finger or laryngoscope responses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Propofol alone or combined with ketamine may be used for total IV anesthesia in healthy cats at the infusion rates determined in this study for attenuation of specific reflex activity. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:907–912)