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Effect of one-lung ventilation on oxygen delivery in anesthetized dogs with an open thoracic cavity

Simon T. KudnigDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 BVSc, MVS
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Eric MonnetDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, PhD
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Miriam RiquelmeDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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James S. GaynorDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Denise CorlissDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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M. D. SalmanDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 BVMS, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of one-lung ventilation on oxygen delivery in anesthetized dogs with an open thoracic cavity.

Animals—8 clinically normal adult Walker Hound dogs.

Procedure—Each dog was anesthetized and subjected to one-lung ventilation during a period when it had an open thoracic cavity. A Swan-Ganz catheter was used to measure hemodynamic variables and obtain mixed-venous blood samples. A catheter was inserted in the dorsal pedal artery to measure arterial pressure and obtain arterial blood samples. Oxygen delivery index was calculated and used to assess effects of one-lung ventilation on cardiopulmonary function. Effects on hemodynamic and pulmonary variables were analyzed.

Results—One-lung ventilation caused significant decreases in PaO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), mixed-venous oxygen saturation, and arterial oxygen content (CaO2). One-lung ventilation caused significant increases in PaCO2, physiologic dead space, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference. Changes in SaO2, CaO2, and PaCO2, although significantly different, were not considered to be of clinical importance. One-lung ventilation induced a significant increase in pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and shunt fraction. One-lung ventilation did not have a significant effect on cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, pulmonary vascular resistance index, and oxygen delivery index.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—One-lung ventilation affected gas exchange and hemodynamic function, although oxygen delivery in clinically normal dogs was not affected during a period with an open thoracic cavity. One-lung ventilation can be used safely in healthy dogs with an open thoracic cavity during surgery. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:443–448)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of one-lung ventilation on oxygen delivery in anesthetized dogs with an open thoracic cavity.

Animals—8 clinically normal adult Walker Hound dogs.

Procedure—Each dog was anesthetized and subjected to one-lung ventilation during a period when it had an open thoracic cavity. A Swan-Ganz catheter was used to measure hemodynamic variables and obtain mixed-venous blood samples. A catheter was inserted in the dorsal pedal artery to measure arterial pressure and obtain arterial blood samples. Oxygen delivery index was calculated and used to assess effects of one-lung ventilation on cardiopulmonary function. Effects on hemodynamic and pulmonary variables were analyzed.

Results—One-lung ventilation caused significant decreases in PaO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), mixed-venous oxygen saturation, and arterial oxygen content (CaO2). One-lung ventilation caused significant increases in PaCO2, physiologic dead space, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference. Changes in SaO2, CaO2, and PaCO2, although significantly different, were not considered to be of clinical importance. One-lung ventilation induced a significant increase in pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and shunt fraction. One-lung ventilation did not have a significant effect on cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, pulmonary vascular resistance index, and oxygen delivery index.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—One-lung ventilation affected gas exchange and hemodynamic function, although oxygen delivery in clinically normal dogs was not affected during a period with an open thoracic cavity. One-lung ventilation can be used safely in healthy dogs with an open thoracic cavity during surgery. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:443–448)