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Diagnostic value of the use of lateral and occlusal radiographic views in comparison with periodontal probing for the assessment of periodontal attachment of the canine teeth in dogs

Anson J. Tsugawa VMD1,2, Frank J. M. Verstraete DrMedVet3, Philip H. Kass DVM, PhD4, and Cecilia Görrel Vet MB, DDS5
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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Present address is the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 3 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 5 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diagnostic value of 2 intraoral bisecting angle radiographic views in comparison with periodontal probing for the assessment of periodontal attachment of the canine teeth in dogs.

Study Population—466 canine teeth from 117 dogs.

Procedure—Periodontal probing measurements were recorded, and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were calculated at the mesial, buccal, distal, and lingual (or palatal) surfaces on each canine tooth. Occlusal and lateral radiographs of the canine teeth were obtained. Alveolar margin height (AMH) was measured at the same 4 surfaces. Values for AMH and CAL were compared on the basis of tooth surface, dental arch, and radiographic view.

Results—The AMH at the mesial and distal surfaces of the mandibular canine teeth was measurable on the lateral view and was significantly correlated with CAL. Similar results were found for the mesial and distal surfaces of the maxillary canine teeth. Buccal and lingual AMH were measured on the mandibular occlusal radiographic view, and values were significantly correlated with CAL, but only the buccal AMH could be assessed on the occlusal radiographic view of the maxilla with values that correlated significantly with CAL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lateral radiographic view is suitable for evaluating periodontal attachment at the mesial and distal surfaces of the canine teeth in dogs. The occlusal radiographic view is suitable for assessing buccal surfaces as well as the lingual surface of mandibular canine teeth but not the palatal surface of maxillary canine teeth in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:255–261)