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Influence of age of horse on results of quantitative electromyographic needle examination of skeletal muscles in Dutch Warmblood horses

Inge D. WijnbergDepartment of Equine Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 12, 3584 CM Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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Hessel FranssenRudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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Johannes H. van der KolkDepartment of Equine Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 12, 3584 CM Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the influence of age on results of quantitative analysis of electromyographic (EMG) needle examination in the subclavian, triceps, and lateral vastus muscles of Dutch Warmblood horses.

Animals—7 healthy young Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 13 to 18 months old), 7 healthy adult Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 4 to 10 years old), and 7 healthy elderly Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 18 to 21 years old).

Procedure—An EMG needle examination was performed to evaluate insertional activity, spontaneous activity, and motor unit action potential (MUAP) variables. Although all horses were conscious, young horses were sedated prior to examination.

Results—Mean insertional activity in young horses was significantly lower than in elderly horses. Pathologic spontaneous activity was rarely found in young and adult horses but was frequently evident in all muscles in all elderly horses. The MUAP duration and amplitude were significantly lower in all muscles of young horses, compared with values for adult and elderly horses. The MUAP duration and number of phases and turns were significantly lower in adult horses than in elderly horses. Group differences for percentages of polyphasic and complex MUAPs were also found. The 95% confidence intervals for MUAP duration, MUAP amplitude, and number of phases and turns for the subclavian, triceps, and lateral vastus muscles were significantly lower in young horses than in adult or elderly horses.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Age of the horse being examined should be considered when EMG examination is performed. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:70–75)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the influence of age on results of quantitative analysis of electromyographic (EMG) needle examination in the subclavian, triceps, and lateral vastus muscles of Dutch Warmblood horses.

Animals—7 healthy young Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 13 to 18 months old), 7 healthy adult Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 4 to 10 years old), and 7 healthy elderly Dutch Warmblood horses (range, 18 to 21 years old).

Procedure—An EMG needle examination was performed to evaluate insertional activity, spontaneous activity, and motor unit action potential (MUAP) variables. Although all horses were conscious, young horses were sedated prior to examination.

Results—Mean insertional activity in young horses was significantly lower than in elderly horses. Pathologic spontaneous activity was rarely found in young and adult horses but was frequently evident in all muscles in all elderly horses. The MUAP duration and amplitude were significantly lower in all muscles of young horses, compared with values for adult and elderly horses. The MUAP duration and number of phases and turns were significantly lower in adult horses than in elderly horses. Group differences for percentages of polyphasic and complex MUAPs were also found. The 95% confidence intervals for MUAP duration, MUAP amplitude, and number of phases and turns for the subclavian, triceps, and lateral vastus muscles were significantly lower in young horses than in adult or elderly horses.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Age of the horse being examined should be considered when EMG examination is performed. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:70–75)