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Evaluation of lysozyme and lactoferrin in lacrimal and other ocular glands of bison and cattle and in tears of bison

Chantale L. PinardDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
Present address is Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada J2S 7C6.

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 DVM, MS
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Mark L. WeissDepartment of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 PhD
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Alan H. BrightmanDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, MS
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Bradley W. FenwickDepartment of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Harriet J. DavidsonDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, MS

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate lactoferrin and lysozyme content in various ocular glands of bison and cattle and in tears of bison.

Sample Population—Tissues of ocular glands obtained from 15 bison and 15 cattle and tears collected from 38 bison.

Procedure—Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect lysozyme and lactoferrin in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the ocular glands. Protein gel electrophoresis was used to analyze ocular glands and pooled bison tears by use of a tris-glycine gel and SDS-PAGE. Western blotting was used to detect lactoferrin and lysozyme.

Results—Immunohistochemical staining for lactoferrin was evident in the lacrimal gland and gland of the third eyelid in cattle and bison and the deep gland of the third eyelid (Harder's gland) in cattle. Equivocal staining for lactoferrin was seen for the Harder's gland in bison. An 80-kd band (lactoferrin) was detected via electrophoresis and western blots in the lacrimal gland and gland of the third eyelid in cattle and bison, Harder's glands of cattle, and bison tears. An inconsistent band was seen in Harder's glands of bison. Lysozyme was not detected in the lacrimal gland of cattle or bison with the use of immunohistochemical analysis or western blots. Western blots of bison tears did not reveal lysozyme.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Distribution of lactoferrin and a lack of lysozyme are similar in the lacrimal gland of cattle and bison. Differences in other tear components may be responsible for variability in the susceptibility to infectious corneal diseases that exists between bison and cattle. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:104–108)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate lactoferrin and lysozyme content in various ocular glands of bison and cattle and in tears of bison.

Sample Population—Tissues of ocular glands obtained from 15 bison and 15 cattle and tears collected from 38 bison.

Procedure—Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect lysozyme and lactoferrin in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the ocular glands. Protein gel electrophoresis was used to analyze ocular glands and pooled bison tears by use of a tris-glycine gel and SDS-PAGE. Western blotting was used to detect lactoferrin and lysozyme.

Results—Immunohistochemical staining for lactoferrin was evident in the lacrimal gland and gland of the third eyelid in cattle and bison and the deep gland of the third eyelid (Harder's gland) in cattle. Equivocal staining for lactoferrin was seen for the Harder's gland in bison. An 80-kd band (lactoferrin) was detected via electrophoresis and western blots in the lacrimal gland and gland of the third eyelid in cattle and bison, Harder's glands of cattle, and bison tears. An inconsistent band was seen in Harder's glands of bison. Lysozyme was not detected in the lacrimal gland of cattle or bison with the use of immunohistochemical analysis or western blots. Western blots of bison tears did not reveal lysozyme.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Distribution of lactoferrin and a lack of lysozyme are similar in the lacrimal gland of cattle and bison. Differences in other tear components may be responsible for variability in the susceptibility to infectious corneal diseases that exists between bison and cattle. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:104–108)