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Laparoscopic-assisted cystopexy in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 2 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 3 Department of Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 4 Department of Anatomy and Radiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 7 Department of Small Animal Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.

Abstract

Objective—To develop a laparoscopic-assisted technique for cystopexy in dogs.

Animals—8 healthy male dogs, 7 healthy female dogs, and 3 client-owned dogs with retroflexion of the urinary bladder secondary to perineal herniation.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized, and positive pressure ventilation was provided. In the healthy male dogs, the serosal surface of the bladder was sutured to the abdominal wall. In the healthy female dogs, the serosa and muscular layer of the bladder were incised and sutured to the aponeurosis of the external and internal abdominal oblique muscles. Dogs were monitored daily for 30 days after surgery.

Results—All dogs recovered rapidly after surgery and voided normally. In the female dogs, results of urodynamic (leak point pressure and urethral pressure profilometry) and contrast radiographic studies performed 30 days after surgery were similar to results obtained before surgery. Cystopexy was successful in all 3 client-owned dogs, but 1 of these dogs was subsequently euthanatized because of leakage from a colopexy performed at the same time as the cystopexy.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The laparoscopic-assisted cystopexy technique was quick, easy to perform, and not associated with urinary tract infection or abnormalities of urination. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1226–1231).

Abstract

Objective—To develop a laparoscopic-assisted technique for cystopexy in dogs.

Animals—8 healthy male dogs, 7 healthy female dogs, and 3 client-owned dogs with retroflexion of the urinary bladder secondary to perineal herniation.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized, and positive pressure ventilation was provided. In the healthy male dogs, the serosal surface of the bladder was sutured to the abdominal wall. In the healthy female dogs, the serosa and muscular layer of the bladder were incised and sutured to the aponeurosis of the external and internal abdominal oblique muscles. Dogs were monitored daily for 30 days after surgery.

Results—All dogs recovered rapidly after surgery and voided normally. In the female dogs, results of urodynamic (leak point pressure and urethral pressure profilometry) and contrast radiographic studies performed 30 days after surgery were similar to results obtained before surgery. Cystopexy was successful in all 3 client-owned dogs, but 1 of these dogs was subsequently euthanatized because of leakage from a colopexy performed at the same time as the cystopexy.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The laparoscopic-assisted cystopexy technique was quick, easy to perform, and not associated with urinary tract infection or abnormalities of urination. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1226–1231).