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Concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in dogs with naturally developing and experimentally induced arthropathy

Kazuhiro MisumiDepartment of Veterinary Surgery, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-9965, Japan.

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Vladimir VilimInstitute of Rheumatology, N A Slupi 4, 128 50 Praha 2, Czech Republic.

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Stuart D. CarterDepartment of Veterinary Immunology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L693BX, UK.

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Kyoko IchihashiDepartment of Veterinary Surgery, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-9965, Japan.

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Tatsuzo OkaDepartment of Veterinary Physiology, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-9965, Japan.

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Hiroshi SakamotoDepartment of Veterinary Surgery, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-9965, Japan.

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Abstract

Objective—To assay concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in canine sera and synovial fluid (SF), to compare COMP concentrations in clinically normal dogs and dogs with joint disease, and to analyze changes in COMP concentrations in dogs with experimentally induced acute synovitis.

Animals—69 control dogs without joint disease, 23 dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy, and 6 dogs with experimentally induced synovitis.

Procedure—Serum (n = 69) and SF (36) were obtained from control dogs. Samples of serum (n = 23) and SF (13) were obtained from dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy with or without radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA). Serum and SF were obtained before and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after induction of synovitis. The COMP concentrations were determined by use of an inhibition ELISA that had canine cartilage COMP and monoclonal antibody against human COMP.

Results—Concentrations of COMP in serum and SF of control dogs were 31.3 ± 15.3 and 298.7 ± 124.7 μg/ml, respectively. In naturally occurring OA, COMP concentrations in serum (44.9 ± 17.7 μg/ml) and SF (401.7 ± 74.3 μg/ml) were significantly higher than corresponding concentrations in control dogs. The COMP concentration in SF peaked 24 and 48 hours after induction of synovitis, whereas concentration in serum peaked on day 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results supported the hypothesis that COMP concentration in serum and SF of dogs may be altered after cartilage degradation or synovitis. Measurement of COMP concentrations can be useful when differentiating arthropathies in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:598–603)

Abstract

Objective—To assay concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in canine sera and synovial fluid (SF), to compare COMP concentrations in clinically normal dogs and dogs with joint disease, and to analyze changes in COMP concentrations in dogs with experimentally induced acute synovitis.

Animals—69 control dogs without joint disease, 23 dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy, and 6 dogs with experimentally induced synovitis.

Procedure—Serum (n = 69) and SF (36) were obtained from control dogs. Samples of serum (n = 23) and SF (13) were obtained from dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy with or without radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA). Serum and SF were obtained before and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after induction of synovitis. The COMP concentrations were determined by use of an inhibition ELISA that had canine cartilage COMP and monoclonal antibody against human COMP.

Results—Concentrations of COMP in serum and SF of control dogs were 31.3 ± 15.3 and 298.7 ± 124.7 μg/ml, respectively. In naturally occurring OA, COMP concentrations in serum (44.9 ± 17.7 μg/ml) and SF (401.7 ± 74.3 μg/ml) were significantly higher than corresponding concentrations in control dogs. The COMP concentration in SF peaked 24 and 48 hours after induction of synovitis, whereas concentration in serum peaked on day 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results supported the hypothesis that COMP concentration in serum and SF of dogs may be altered after cartilage degradation or synovitis. Measurement of COMP concentrations can be useful when differentiating arthropathies in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:598–603)