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Time-dependent changes in plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole and blood concentrations of 3-methyleneindolenine-adduct in feedlot cattle

Guy H. LoneraganIntegrated Livestock Management program, the Departments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
Present address is Division of Agriculture, West Texas A&M University, West Texas A&M University Box 60998, Canyon, TX 79016.

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 BVSc, PhD
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Paul S. MorleyDepartment of Environmental Health, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, PhD;
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John J. WagnerContinental Beef Research, PO Box 1018, Lamar, CO 81052.

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Gary L. MasonDepartment of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Garold S. YostDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112.

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Mike A. ThorenContiBeef LCC, 5408 Idylwild Tr, Boulder, CO 80301.

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Joni TriantisDepartment of Environmental Health, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Abstract

Objective—To describe time-dependent changes in plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) and blood concentrations of 3-methyleneindolenine (3MEIN)-adduct in feedlot cattle.

Animals—64 yearling steers.

Procedures—Steers were assigned to 2 groups (32 steers/group). During the first 8 weeks, blood samples were collected from group 1 before the morning ration was fed, whereas samples from group 2 were collected 2 to 3 hours after the ration was fed. Blood samples were collected from all steers approximately 4 times/wk for 3 weeks and 3 times/wk for the subsequent 5 weeks. Samples were collected at the same time for all steers for an additional 10 weeks. Plasma samples were analyzed for 3MI concentrations. Blood samples collected from cattle in group 2 during the first 8 weeks were analyzed for 3MEINadduct concentrations.

Results—Mean blood concentration of 3MEINadduct increased to a maximum value on day 33 (0.80 U/μg of protein) and then decreased to a minimum on day 54 0.40 U/μg of protein). Plasma 3MI concentrations initially decreased and remained low until after day 54. Group-1 cattle had lower plasma 3MI concentrations, compared with concentrations for group-2 cattle. Blood 3MEIN-adduct concentrations and plasma 3MI concentrations were not associated with deleterious effects on weight gains.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Blood 3MEIN-adduct concentrations peaked during the period of greatest risk for development of bovine respiratory disease complex. Conversely, plasma 3MI concentrations decreased during the same period. Animal-to-animal variation in metabolic capacity to convert 3MI to 3MEIN may be of more importance than differences in plasma 3MI concentration. Am J Vet Res (2002;63:591–597).

Abstract

Objective—To describe time-dependent changes in plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) and blood concentrations of 3-methyleneindolenine (3MEIN)-adduct in feedlot cattle.

Animals—64 yearling steers.

Procedures—Steers were assigned to 2 groups (32 steers/group). During the first 8 weeks, blood samples were collected from group 1 before the morning ration was fed, whereas samples from group 2 were collected 2 to 3 hours after the ration was fed. Blood samples were collected from all steers approximately 4 times/wk for 3 weeks and 3 times/wk for the subsequent 5 weeks. Samples were collected at the same time for all steers for an additional 10 weeks. Plasma samples were analyzed for 3MI concentrations. Blood samples collected from cattle in group 2 during the first 8 weeks were analyzed for 3MEINadduct concentrations.

Results—Mean blood concentration of 3MEINadduct increased to a maximum value on day 33 (0.80 U/μg of protein) and then decreased to a minimum on day 54 0.40 U/μg of protein). Plasma 3MI concentrations initially decreased and remained low until after day 54. Group-1 cattle had lower plasma 3MI concentrations, compared with concentrations for group-2 cattle. Blood 3MEIN-adduct concentrations and plasma 3MI concentrations were not associated with deleterious effects on weight gains.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Blood 3MEIN-adduct concentrations peaked during the period of greatest risk for development of bovine respiratory disease complex. Conversely, plasma 3MI concentrations decreased during the same period. Animal-to-animal variation in metabolic capacity to convert 3MI to 3MEIN may be of more importance than differences in plasma 3MI concentration. Am J Vet Res (2002;63:591–597).