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Evaluation of skin erythema by use of chromametry and image analysis of digital photographs after intradermal administration of histamine in dogs

Lene BoysenDepartment of Clinical Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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 DVM
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Per SørensenDepartment of Statistics, Leo Pharmaceutical Products, Ballerup, Denmark.
Present address is Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Copenhagen, Denmark.

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 MSc
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Morten LarsenDepartment of Mathematics and Physics, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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 MSc, PhD
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Jørgen SerupDepartments of Dermatological Research, Leo Pharmaceutical Products, Ballerup, Denmark.
Present address is Department of Dermatology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.

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 MD, DMSc
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Flemming KristensenDepartment of Clinical Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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Abstract

Objective—To investigate whether the degree of erythema during an induced erythematous reaction, the histamine skin test reaction, can be assessed objectively by use of chromametry and image analysis of digital photographs.

Animals—9 pet dogs (6 Golden Retrievers and 3 yellow Labrador Retrievers).

Procedure—Histamine phosphate was injected intradermally, and erythema of the wheal reaction was evaluated during the hour that followed. This was done by use of clinical scores, chromametry, and image analysis of digital photographs. Method reproducibility was tested for visual evaluation of printouts of digital photographs and for image analysis of the same photographs.

Results—The coefficient of variation of the technically derived erythema values was < 10%. The reproducibility of image analysis was high and the range of agreement between observers narrow. Using chromametry, it was not possible to differentiate between various degrees of erythema intensity as visually perceived. In contrast, use of image analysis of digital photographs enabled discrimination of slight erythema from moderate and marked erythema. The dynamics of reaction measured by chromametry followed the clinical observation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chromametric values are comparable to those obtained by visual inspection. As the result of standardized conditions, chromametry is preferred over digital photography. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:565–569)

Abstract

Objective—To investigate whether the degree of erythema during an induced erythematous reaction, the histamine skin test reaction, can be assessed objectively by use of chromametry and image analysis of digital photographs.

Animals—9 pet dogs (6 Golden Retrievers and 3 yellow Labrador Retrievers).

Procedure—Histamine phosphate was injected intradermally, and erythema of the wheal reaction was evaluated during the hour that followed. This was done by use of clinical scores, chromametry, and image analysis of digital photographs. Method reproducibility was tested for visual evaluation of printouts of digital photographs and for image analysis of the same photographs.

Results—The coefficient of variation of the technically derived erythema values was < 10%. The reproducibility of image analysis was high and the range of agreement between observers narrow. Using chromametry, it was not possible to differentiate between various degrees of erythema intensity as visually perceived. In contrast, use of image analysis of digital photographs enabled discrimination of slight erythema from moderate and marked erythema. The dynamics of reaction measured by chromametry followed the clinical observation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chromametric values are comparable to those obtained by visual inspection. As the result of standardized conditions, chromametry is preferred over digital photography. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:565–569)