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Effect of desmopressin acetate administration on primary hemostasis in Doberman Pinschers with type-1 von Willebrand disease as assessed by a point-of-care instrument

Mary Beth CallanDepartment of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

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Urs GigerDepartment of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate primary hemostasis following administration of desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) to Doberman Pinschers with type-1 von Willebrand disease (vWD).

Animals—16 nonanemic Doberman Pinschers with type-1 vWD.

Procedure—Closure time (CT), defined as time required for occlusion of an aperture by a platelet plug assessed within the point-of-care instrument, plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentration, and buccal mucosal bleeding time (BMBT) were determined before and 1 hour after administration of DDAVP (1 µg/kg, SC).

Results—Baseline closure times measured with adenosine diphosphate ([ADP-CT], 108 to > 300 seconds; reference range, 52 to 86 seconds) and epinephrine ([EPI-CT], 285 to > 300 seconds; 97 to 225 seconds) as platelet agonists were prolonged in all dogs. Following DDAVP administration, ADP-CT (59 to 186 seconds) was significantly shortened from baseline, but there was no decrease in EPI-CT. Although mean plasma vWF concentration increased significantly after DDAVP administration, only 1 dog had an increase of > 35 U/dL. There was no correlation between increase in plasma vWF concentration and shortening of the ADP-CT. Baseline BMBT was prolonged in 12 of 14 dogs, with significant shortening of BMBT after DDAVP administration in 6 of 7 dogs. In vitro replacement of vWF-deficient plasma with plasma from an unaffected dog shortened the ADP-CT, whereas in vitro addition of DDAVP had no effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of DDAVP to Doberman Pinschers with type-1 vWD resulted in improved hemostatic function, as assessed by the point-of-care instrument and shortening of BMBT, despite minimal increase in plasma vWF concentration. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1700–1706)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate primary hemostasis following administration of desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) to Doberman Pinschers with type-1 von Willebrand disease (vWD).

Animals—16 nonanemic Doberman Pinschers with type-1 vWD.

Procedure—Closure time (CT), defined as time required for occlusion of an aperture by a platelet plug assessed within the point-of-care instrument, plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentration, and buccal mucosal bleeding time (BMBT) were determined before and 1 hour after administration of DDAVP (1 µg/kg, SC).

Results—Baseline closure times measured with adenosine diphosphate ([ADP-CT], 108 to > 300 seconds; reference range, 52 to 86 seconds) and epinephrine ([EPI-CT], 285 to > 300 seconds; 97 to 225 seconds) as platelet agonists were prolonged in all dogs. Following DDAVP administration, ADP-CT (59 to 186 seconds) was significantly shortened from baseline, but there was no decrease in EPI-CT. Although mean plasma vWF concentration increased significantly after DDAVP administration, only 1 dog had an increase of > 35 U/dL. There was no correlation between increase in plasma vWF concentration and shortening of the ADP-CT. Baseline BMBT was prolonged in 12 of 14 dogs, with significant shortening of BMBT after DDAVP administration in 6 of 7 dogs. In vitro replacement of vWF-deficient plasma with plasma from an unaffected dog shortened the ADP-CT, whereas in vitro addition of DDAVP had no effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of DDAVP to Doberman Pinschers with type-1 vWD resulted in improved hemostatic function, as assessed by the point-of-care instrument and shortening of BMBT, despite minimal increase in plasma vWF concentration. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1700–1706)