Advertisement

Correlation between plasma leptin concentration and body fat content in dogs

Mayumi M. SagawaResearch Center, Nippon Pet Food Co, Ltd; 2020 Umeyama, Asaba, Shizuoka 437-1105, Japan.

Search for other papers by Mayumi M. Sagawa in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Fumio NakadomoOsaka Prefectural College of Nursing, 3-7-30 Habikino, Habikino, Osaka 583-8116, Japan.

Search for other papers by Fumio Nakadomo in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Tsutomu HonjohMorinaga Institute of Biological Science, 2-1-1 Shimosueyoshi 2, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-8504, Japan.

Search for other papers by Tsutomu Honjoh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Katsumi IshiokaDepartment of Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan.

Search for other papers by Katsumi Ishioka in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
Masayuki SaitoDepartment of Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan.

Search for other papers by Masayuki Saito in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the relationship between plasma leptin concentration and body fat content in dogs.

Animals—20 spayed female Beagles that were 10 months old at the start of the experiment.

Procedure—Dogs were kept under regulated feeding and exercise conditions for 21 weeks, resulting in a wide range of body weights, body condition scores (BCS), and subcutaneous thicknesses. Plasma leptin concentration was measured by use of a canine leptin- specific ELISA test to evaluate its correlation to body fat content estimated by the deuterium oxide dilution method. Plasma concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) were also measured.

Results—Body fat content (9 to 60% of body weight) was positively and closely correlated ( r = 0.920; n = 20; P < 0.001) to plasma leptin concentration (0.67 to 8.06 ng/ml), compared with other variables (ie, glucose, cholesterol, TG, and NEFA; r = 0.142, 0.412, 0.074, and 0.182, respectively).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The positive relationship between plasma leptin concentration and body fat content in dogs was similar to correlations reported for humans and rodents, suggesting that plasma leptin is a quantitative marker of adiposity in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:7–10)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the relationship between plasma leptin concentration and body fat content in dogs.

Animals—20 spayed female Beagles that were 10 months old at the start of the experiment.

Procedure—Dogs were kept under regulated feeding and exercise conditions for 21 weeks, resulting in a wide range of body weights, body condition scores (BCS), and subcutaneous thicknesses. Plasma leptin concentration was measured by use of a canine leptin- specific ELISA test to evaluate its correlation to body fat content estimated by the deuterium oxide dilution method. Plasma concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) were also measured.

Results—Body fat content (9 to 60% of body weight) was positively and closely correlated ( r = 0.920; n = 20; P < 0.001) to plasma leptin concentration (0.67 to 8.06 ng/ml), compared with other variables (ie, glucose, cholesterol, TG, and NEFA; r = 0.142, 0.412, 0.074, and 0.182, respectively).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The positive relationship between plasma leptin concentration and body fat content in dogs was similar to correlations reported for humans and rodents, suggesting that plasma leptin is a quantitative marker of adiposity in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:7–10)