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Late-phase reactions to intradermal testing with Dermatophagoides farinae in healthy dogs and dogs with house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis

Andrew HillierDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Lynette K. ColeDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Kenneth W. KwochkaDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Catherine McCallHeska Corp, 1613 Prospect Pkwy, Ft Collins, CO 80525.

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 DPhil

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of late-phase reactions to intradermal testing with Dermatophagoides farinae in healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitis and an immediate reaction to D farinae.

Animals—6 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with atopic dermatitis and immediate reactions to D farinae.

Procedure—Intradermal tests were performed with D farinae at 1:1,000 wt/vol and 1:50,000 wt/vol concentrations, and skin reactivity was evaluated after 0.25, 6, and 24 hours. Serum D farinae-specific IgE antibodies were assayed. Extent of lesions (atopy index) and pruritus (visual analogue scale) were evaluated in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Results—Late-phase reactions were observed in healthy dogs at 6 hours (n = 2 dogs) and 24 hours (1) with the 1:1,000 wt/vol concentration, and at 6 hours (1) and 24 hours (1) with the 1:50,000 wt/vol concentration of allergen. Late-phase reactions in healthy dogs were only observed in dogs with an immediate reaction to D farinae. Late-phase reactions were observed in 11 of 20 dogs with atopic dermatitis at 6 and 24 hours with the 1:1,000 wt/vol concentration and in 10 of 20 at 6 and 24 hours with the 1:50,000 wt/vol concentration of allergen. There was no difference in mean atopy index, mean visual analogue scale of pruritus, or mean serum D farinae-specific IgE concentration of dogs with a late-phase reaction, compared to dogs without a late-phase reaction.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Late-phase reactions may be observed after an immediate reaction to intradermal skin testing in healthy and allergic dogs but are more commonly observed in dogs with atopic dermatitis. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:69–73)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of late-phase reactions to intradermal testing with Dermatophagoides farinae in healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitis and an immediate reaction to D farinae.

Animals—6 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with atopic dermatitis and immediate reactions to D farinae.

Procedure—Intradermal tests were performed with D farinae at 1:1,000 wt/vol and 1:50,000 wt/vol concentrations, and skin reactivity was evaluated after 0.25, 6, and 24 hours. Serum D farinae-specific IgE antibodies were assayed. Extent of lesions (atopy index) and pruritus (visual analogue scale) were evaluated in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Results—Late-phase reactions were observed in healthy dogs at 6 hours (n = 2 dogs) and 24 hours (1) with the 1:1,000 wt/vol concentration, and at 6 hours (1) and 24 hours (1) with the 1:50,000 wt/vol concentration of allergen. Late-phase reactions in healthy dogs were only observed in dogs with an immediate reaction to D farinae. Late-phase reactions were observed in 11 of 20 dogs with atopic dermatitis at 6 and 24 hours with the 1:1,000 wt/vol concentration and in 10 of 20 at 6 and 24 hours with the 1:50,000 wt/vol concentration of allergen. There was no difference in mean atopy index, mean visual analogue scale of pruritus, or mean serum D farinae-specific IgE concentration of dogs with a late-phase reaction, compared to dogs without a late-phase reaction.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Late-phase reactions may be observed after an immediate reaction to intradermal skin testing in healthy and allergic dogs but are more commonly observed in dogs with atopic dermatitis. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:69–73)