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Evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from feline vaccine site-associated sarcomas for feline foamy virus DNA

Beverly A. KidneyDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Deborah M. HainesDepartment of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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John A. EllisDepartment of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Micheline L. BurnhamDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Marion L. JacksonDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a group of vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) for the presence of feline foamy virus (FeFV) DNA, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.

Sample Population—50 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks from VSS of cats.

Procedure—DNA was extracted from FFPE sections of each tumor, and regions of the gag and pol genes of FeFV were amplified by use of PCR methods, using 1 primer set for each region. Sensitivity of the method was compared between fresh and FFPE cells, using mouse kidney tissue that was injected with FeFVinfected cultured cells and using agarose-cell pellets.

Results—Feline foamy virus DNA was not detected in VSS tissues. Sensitivity of the method was 10 times greater in fresh versus FFPE mouse tissues. Sensitivity of the method in fresh FeFV-infected cultured cells versus FFPE agarose-cell pellets was equal when fixation was 24 or 48 hours and 10 times greater when fixation was 72 hours or 1 week.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—A PCR-based method can be successfully applied to FFPE tissues for FeFV DNA detection. Results suggest there is no direct FeFV involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:60–63)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a group of vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) for the presence of feline foamy virus (FeFV) DNA, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.

Sample Population—50 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks from VSS of cats.

Procedure—DNA was extracted from FFPE sections of each tumor, and regions of the gag and pol genes of FeFV were amplified by use of PCR methods, using 1 primer set for each region. Sensitivity of the method was compared between fresh and FFPE cells, using mouse kidney tissue that was injected with FeFVinfected cultured cells and using agarose-cell pellets.

Results—Feline foamy virus DNA was not detected in VSS tissues. Sensitivity of the method was 10 times greater in fresh versus FFPE mouse tissues. Sensitivity of the method in fresh FeFV-infected cultured cells versus FFPE agarose-cell pellets was equal when fixation was 24 or 48 hours and 10 times greater when fixation was 72 hours or 1 week.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—A PCR-based method can be successfully applied to FFPE tissues for FeFV DNA detection. Results suggest there is no direct FeFV involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:60–63)