Advertisement

Thyroid function testing in Greyhounds

Kathy R. GaughanVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5701

Search for other papers by Kathy R. Gaughan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
and
David S. BruyetteVeterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5701
Present address is the West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, 1818 S Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90025

Search for other papers by David S. Bruyette in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate thyroid function in healthy Greyhounds, compared with healthy non-Greyhound pet dogs, and to establish appropriate reference range values for Greyhounds.

Animals—98 clinically normal Greyhounds and 19 clinically normal non-Greyhounds.

Procedures—Greyhounds were in 2 groups as follows: those receiving testosterone for estrus suppression (T-group Greyhounds) and those not receiving estrus suppressive medication (NT-group Greyhounds). Serum thyroxine (T4) and free thyroxine (fT4) concentrations were determined before and after administration of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH). Basal serum canine thyroid stimulating hormone (cTSH) concentrations were determined on available stored sera.

Results—Basal serum T4 and fT4 concentrations were significantly lower in Greyhounds than in non- Greyhounds. Serum T4 concentrations after TSH and TRH administration were significantly lower in Greyhounds than in non-Greyhounds. Serum fT4 concentrations after TSH and TRH administration were significantly lower in NT-group than T-group Greyhounds and non-Greyhounds. Mean cTSH concentrations were not different between Greyhounds and non-Greyhounds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Previously established canine reference range values for basal serum T4 and fT4 may not be appropriate for use in Greyhounds. Greyhound-specific reference range values for basal serum T4 and fT4 concentrations should be applied when evaluating thyroid function in Greyhounds. Basal cTSH concentrations in Greyhounds are similar to non-Greyhound pet dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1130–1133)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate thyroid function in healthy Greyhounds, compared with healthy non-Greyhound pet dogs, and to establish appropriate reference range values for Greyhounds.

Animals—98 clinically normal Greyhounds and 19 clinically normal non-Greyhounds.

Procedures—Greyhounds were in 2 groups as follows: those receiving testosterone for estrus suppression (T-group Greyhounds) and those not receiving estrus suppressive medication (NT-group Greyhounds). Serum thyroxine (T4) and free thyroxine (fT4) concentrations were determined before and after administration of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH). Basal serum canine thyroid stimulating hormone (cTSH) concentrations were determined on available stored sera.

Results—Basal serum T4 and fT4 concentrations were significantly lower in Greyhounds than in non- Greyhounds. Serum T4 concentrations after TSH and TRH administration were significantly lower in Greyhounds than in non-Greyhounds. Serum fT4 concentrations after TSH and TRH administration were significantly lower in NT-group than T-group Greyhounds and non-Greyhounds. Mean cTSH concentrations were not different between Greyhounds and non-Greyhounds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Previously established canine reference range values for basal serum T4 and fT4 may not be appropriate for use in Greyhounds. Greyhound-specific reference range values for basal serum T4 and fT4 concentrations should be applied when evaluating thyroid function in Greyhounds. Basal cTSH concentrations in Greyhounds are similar to non-Greyhound pet dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1130–1133)