Advertisement

Results of intradermal tests in horses without atopy and horses with atopic dermatitis or recurrent urticaria

Gwendolen LorchDepartments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by Gwendolen Lorch in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Andrew HillierDepartments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by Andrew Hillier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc
,
Kenneth W. KwochkaDepartments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by Kenneth W. Kwochka in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
William A. SavilleVeterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by William A. Saville in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Bruce E. LeRoyDepartments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by Bruce E. LeRoy in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Abstract

Objective—To compare results of intradermal tests (IDT) for environmental allergens at 30 minutes and 4, 6, and 24 hours after injection in horses without atopy and horses with atopic dermatitis (AD) or recurrent urticaria (RU).

Animals—22 horses without atopy, 10 horses with RU, and 7 horses with AD.

Procedure—In all horses, medical history was obtained, and results of physical examination, hematologic examination, serum biochemical analyses, examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and IDT with 73 allergens were examined.

Results—Horses with AD or RU had a significantly greater mean number of positive reactions for IDT, compared with horses without atopy. Horses with AD had a significantly greater number of positive reactions than horses without atopy in every allergen group at all time periods, except for molds at 4 and 24 hours. Horses with RU had a significantly greater number of positive reactions than horses without atopy in every allergen group, except for molds at 30 minutes and 4 and 6 hours, trees at 4 and 6 hours, and grasses at 4 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A significantly greater number of positive reactions for IDT in horses with AD or RU, compared with horses without atopy, provides evidence of type-I IgE-mediated hypersensitivity for these diseases. Evaluation of results of IDT performed in horses with AD or RU is useful in determining specific allergens for the formulation of immunotherapy along with providing identification of allergens that could be useful when creating avoidance strategies. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1051–1059)

Abstract

Objective—To compare results of intradermal tests (IDT) for environmental allergens at 30 minutes and 4, 6, and 24 hours after injection in horses without atopy and horses with atopic dermatitis (AD) or recurrent urticaria (RU).

Animals—22 horses without atopy, 10 horses with RU, and 7 horses with AD.

Procedure—In all horses, medical history was obtained, and results of physical examination, hematologic examination, serum biochemical analyses, examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and IDT with 73 allergens were examined.

Results—Horses with AD or RU had a significantly greater mean number of positive reactions for IDT, compared with horses without atopy. Horses with AD had a significantly greater number of positive reactions than horses without atopy in every allergen group at all time periods, except for molds at 4 and 24 hours. Horses with RU had a significantly greater number of positive reactions than horses without atopy in every allergen group, except for molds at 30 minutes and 4 and 6 hours, trees at 4 and 6 hours, and grasses at 4 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A significantly greater number of positive reactions for IDT in horses with AD or RU, compared with horses without atopy, provides evidence of type-I IgE-mediated hypersensitivity for these diseases. Evaluation of results of IDT performed in horses with AD or RU is useful in determining specific allergens for the formulation of immunotherapy along with providing identification of allergens that could be useful when creating avoidance strategies. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1051–1059)