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Analgesic, hemodynamic, and respiratory effects induced by caudal epidural administration of meperidine hydrochloride in mares

Roman T. SkardaDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

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 Dr med vet, PhD
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William W. Muir IIIDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

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 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To determine the analgesic, hemodynamic, and respiratory effects induced by caudal epidural administration of meperidine hydrochloride in mares.

Animals—7 healthy mares.

Procedure—Each mare received meperidine (5%; 0.8 mg/kg of body weight) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution via caudal epidural injection on 2 occasions. At least 2 weeks elapsed between treatments. Degree of analgesia in response to noxious electrical, thermal, and skin and muscle prick stimuli was determined before and for 5 hours after treatment. In addition, cardiovascular and respiratory variables were measured and degree of sedation (head position) and ataxia (pelvic limb position) evaluated.

Results—Caudal epidural administration of meperidine induced bilateral analgesia extending from the coccygeal to S1 dermatomes in standing mares; degree of sedation and ataxia was minimal. Mean (± SD) onset of analgesia was 12 ± 4 minutes after meperidine administration, and duration of analgesia ranged from 240 minutes to the entire 300-minute testing period. Heart and respiratory rates, rectal temperature, arterial blood pressures, Hct, PaO2, PaCO2, pHa, total solids and bicarbonate concentrations, and base excess were not significantly different from baseline values after caudal epidural administration of either meperidine or saline solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Caudal epidural administration of meperidine induced prolonged perineal analgesia in healthy mares. Degree of sedation and ataxia was minimal, and adverse cardiorespiratory effects were not detected. Meperidine may be a useful agent for induction of caudal epidural analgesia in mares undergoing prolonged diagnostic, obstetric, or surgical procedures in the anal and perineal regions. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1001–1007)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the analgesic, hemodynamic, and respiratory effects induced by caudal epidural administration of meperidine hydrochloride in mares.

Animals—7 healthy mares.

Procedure—Each mare received meperidine (5%; 0.8 mg/kg of body weight) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution via caudal epidural injection on 2 occasions. At least 2 weeks elapsed between treatments. Degree of analgesia in response to noxious electrical, thermal, and skin and muscle prick stimuli was determined before and for 5 hours after treatment. In addition, cardiovascular and respiratory variables were measured and degree of sedation (head position) and ataxia (pelvic limb position) evaluated.

Results—Caudal epidural administration of meperidine induced bilateral analgesia extending from the coccygeal to S1 dermatomes in standing mares; degree of sedation and ataxia was minimal. Mean (± SD) onset of analgesia was 12 ± 4 minutes after meperidine administration, and duration of analgesia ranged from 240 minutes to the entire 300-minute testing period. Heart and respiratory rates, rectal temperature, arterial blood pressures, Hct, PaO2, PaCO2, pHa, total solids and bicarbonate concentrations, and base excess were not significantly different from baseline values after caudal epidural administration of either meperidine or saline solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Caudal epidural administration of meperidine induced prolonged perineal analgesia in healthy mares. Degree of sedation and ataxia was minimal, and adverse cardiorespiratory effects were not detected. Meperidine may be a useful agent for induction of caudal epidural analgesia in mares undergoing prolonged diagnostic, obstetric, or surgical procedures in the anal and perineal regions. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1001–1007)