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Biochemical characterization of cartilage affected by osteochondritis dissecans in the humeral head of dogs

James L. Tomlinson DVM, MVSc1, James L. Cook DVM, PhD2, Keiichi Kuroki DVM3, John M. Kreeger DVM, PhD4, and Mark A. Anderson DVM5
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  • 1 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 5 Veterinary Surgical Services, 1520 S Brentwood Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63144.

Abstract

Objective—To determine glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration and immunohistochemical staining characteristics of type-I, -II, and -X collagen from cartilage affected by osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in dogs.

Animals—31 dogs with OCD and 11 clinically normal purpose-bred dogs.

Procedure—Cartilage samples were evaluated microscopically, and GAG content was determined. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for type-I, -II, and -X collagen. Sections were subjectively evaluated for location and intensity of staining.

Results—Cartilage affected by OCD had a variety of pathologic changes and significantly lower GAG concentrations than did normal cartilage. Normal cartilage had no detectable type-I collagen. For dogs < 9 months of age, cartilage affected by OCD had significantly more type-I collagen but significantly less type- X collagen than did control cartilage. For dogs > 12 months of age, cartilage affected by OCD contained significantly more type-I collagen than did control cartilage. There was a significant negative correlation between immunoreactivity of type-I collagen and that of type-II and -X collagen. A significant positive correlation was found between immunoreactivity of type-II and -X collagen.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cartilage affected by OCD contains less GAG, more type-I collagen, and less type-X collagen, compared with normal cartilage. A direct correlation between these changes and the etiopathogenesis of OCD was not established. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:876–881)

Abstract

Objective—To determine glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration and immunohistochemical staining characteristics of type-I, -II, and -X collagen from cartilage affected by osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in dogs.

Animals—31 dogs with OCD and 11 clinically normal purpose-bred dogs.

Procedure—Cartilage samples were evaluated microscopically, and GAG content was determined. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for type-I, -II, and -X collagen. Sections were subjectively evaluated for location and intensity of staining.

Results—Cartilage affected by OCD had a variety of pathologic changes and significantly lower GAG concentrations than did normal cartilage. Normal cartilage had no detectable type-I collagen. For dogs < 9 months of age, cartilage affected by OCD had significantly more type-I collagen but significantly less type- X collagen than did control cartilage. For dogs > 12 months of age, cartilage affected by OCD contained significantly more type-I collagen than did control cartilage. There was a significant negative correlation between immunoreactivity of type-I collagen and that of type-II and -X collagen. A significant positive correlation was found between immunoreactivity of type-II and -X collagen.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cartilage affected by OCD contains less GAG, more type-I collagen, and less type-X collagen, compared with normal cartilage. A direct correlation between these changes and the etiopathogenesis of OCD was not established. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:876–881)