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Maternal expression of functional lipoprotein lipase and effects on body fat mass and body condition scores of mature cats with lipoprotein lipase deficiency

Robert C. BackusDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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David G. GinzingerDepartment of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 4H4.
Present address is UCSF-Cancer Center, Cancer Genetics Program, Box 0808, San Francisco, CA 94143-0808.

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Katherine J. D. Ashbourne ExcoffonDepartment of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 4H4.
Present address is 3441 Hillandale Rd, Davenport, IA 52806-5132.

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Susanne M. CleeDepartment of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 4H4.

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Michael R. HaydenDepartment of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 4H4.

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Robert H. EckelDepartment of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262.
Present address is UCSF-Cancer Center, Cancer Genetics Program, Box 0808, San Francisco, CA 94143-0808.

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M. Anne HickmanDepartments of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
Present address is Pfizer Inc, Central Research Division, Eastern Point Rd, Groton, CT 06340.

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Quinton R. RogersDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Abstract

Objective—To assess effects of deficiency of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) on body condition scores and lean and fat body masses of adult cats.

Animals—12 cats without LPL mutations and 23 cats that were heterozygous or homozygous carriers of the Gly412Arg LPL mutation.

Procedure—Lean and fat body masses were estimated by use of body condition scores and change in enrichment of serum after IV administration of deuterium oxide. Mass spectroscopy and infrared absorbance methods were used to determine deuterium enrichment.

Results—Fat body mass (mean ± SD; 0.2 ± 0.1 kg) and percentage body fat (6.2 ± 1.4%) of homozygotes were significantly less than those of clinically normal cats and heterozygotes (0.7 ± 0.1 kg, 18.2 ± 1.6% and 0.5 ± 0.1 kg, 15.6 ± 1.7%, respectively). Homozygous offspring of homozygous dams had significantly less fat body mass (0.1 ± 0.1 kg) and percentage body fat (2.1 ± 1.0%) than homozygous offspring of heterozygous dams (0.3 ± 0.1 kg and 9.2 ± 1.7%, respectively). Lean body mass did not differ significantly among groups. For all groups, percentage body fat was significantly correlated with body condition score (r = 0.65), and body condition scores supported findings for fat body mass.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Deficiency of LPL activity in cats diminishes stores of body fat. This is consistent with a low rate of de novo synthesis of fat. The effect of dam on body masses in mature LPLdeficient cats indicates nutrient programming of adipose formation during gestation or lactation. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:264–269)

Abstract

Objective—To assess effects of deficiency of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) on body condition scores and lean and fat body masses of adult cats.

Animals—12 cats without LPL mutations and 23 cats that were heterozygous or homozygous carriers of the Gly412Arg LPL mutation.

Procedure—Lean and fat body masses were estimated by use of body condition scores and change in enrichment of serum after IV administration of deuterium oxide. Mass spectroscopy and infrared absorbance methods were used to determine deuterium enrichment.

Results—Fat body mass (mean ± SD; 0.2 ± 0.1 kg) and percentage body fat (6.2 ± 1.4%) of homozygotes were significantly less than those of clinically normal cats and heterozygotes (0.7 ± 0.1 kg, 18.2 ± 1.6% and 0.5 ± 0.1 kg, 15.6 ± 1.7%, respectively). Homozygous offspring of homozygous dams had significantly less fat body mass (0.1 ± 0.1 kg) and percentage body fat (2.1 ± 1.0%) than homozygous offspring of heterozygous dams (0.3 ± 0.1 kg and 9.2 ± 1.7%, respectively). Lean body mass did not differ significantly among groups. For all groups, percentage body fat was significantly correlated with body condition score (r = 0.65), and body condition scores supported findings for fat body mass.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Deficiency of LPL activity in cats diminishes stores of body fat. This is consistent with a low rate of de novo synthesis of fat. The effect of dam on body masses in mature LPLdeficient cats indicates nutrient programming of adipose formation during gestation or lactation. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:264–269)