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Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of equine retinal and pineal gland phosducin

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  • 1 Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, University of Munich, KÖniginstrasse 16, D-80539 Munich, Germany.
  • | 2 Laboratories Dr.BÖse GmbH, Richthofenstrasse 29, D-31137 Hildesheim, Germany.
  • | 3 Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, University of Munich, KÖniginstrasse 16, D-80539 Munich, Germany.

Abstract

Objectives—To determine the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of equine retinal and pineal gland phosducin (PHD) and to clone these sequences.

Sample Population—Samples of equine retinal RNA.

Procedure—A primer set was designed for use in identifying a fragment of the equine PHD nucleotide sequence, derived from retinal RNA samples, and subsequently for use to deduce specific primers for additional examination. The full-length cDNA was determined by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). For full-length cDNA, newly designed primers were used. Nucleotide sequences were analyzed by use of computer software. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared with sequences of PHD reported for other species. In addition, the sequence of equine pineal PHD was cloned.

Results—The cDNA nucleotide sequence for equine PHD was 1,209 base pairs (bp) in length with an openreading frame encoding a protein of 245 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 28.214 kd. Similarity with amino acid sequences of PHD from other species was 89 to 93%. Sequences of equine PHD from retina and pineal gland were identical. Equine PHD contained a peptide sequence with 100% homology to an uveitopathogenic peptide reported for rat PHD.

Conclusions—Equine PHD is a highly conserved protein that has homology of immunologic interest with rat PHD. These results establish a basis for studying the role of PHD in ocular inflammation of horses. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:61–66)

Abstract

Objectives—To determine the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of equine retinal and pineal gland phosducin (PHD) and to clone these sequences.

Sample Population—Samples of equine retinal RNA.

Procedure—A primer set was designed for use in identifying a fragment of the equine PHD nucleotide sequence, derived from retinal RNA samples, and subsequently for use to deduce specific primers for additional examination. The full-length cDNA was determined by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). For full-length cDNA, newly designed primers were used. Nucleotide sequences were analyzed by use of computer software. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared with sequences of PHD reported for other species. In addition, the sequence of equine pineal PHD was cloned.

Results—The cDNA nucleotide sequence for equine PHD was 1,209 base pairs (bp) in length with an openreading frame encoding a protein of 245 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 28.214 kd. Similarity with amino acid sequences of PHD from other species was 89 to 93%. Sequences of equine PHD from retina and pineal gland were identical. Equine PHD contained a peptide sequence with 100% homology to an uveitopathogenic peptide reported for rat PHD.

Conclusions—Equine PHD is a highly conserved protein that has homology of immunologic interest with rat PHD. These results establish a basis for studying the role of PHD in ocular inflammation of horses. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:61–66)