Spectral analysis of circadian rhythms in heart rate variability of dogs

Toshiyuki Matsunaga Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Takuma Harada Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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 DVM, PhD
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Takeshi Mitsui Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Masanori Inokuma Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Masatoshi Hashimoto Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Makoto Miyauchi Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Hiroyuki Murano Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Yasunori Shibutani Toxicology Laboratory, Research Center, Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, 342 Gensuke, Fujieda, Shizuoka 426- 8640, Japan.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine characteristics of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) during a 24-hour period in dogs and to evaluate the effects of vagal and sympathetic tone on HRV.

Animals—16 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedure—Power spectral analysis of HRV was conducted, using 24-hour ambulatory ECG recordings. Circadian rhythms were evaluated in terms of absolute units of low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) powers, their ratio (LF:HF), and their adjusted (normalized) units (LF[norm] and HF[norm]). Three or 4 dogs were used for simultaneous measurement of heart rate and respiratory waveform as well as to evaluate treatment (propranolol, atropine, or both) administered to cause blockade of the autonomic nervous system.

Results—Values for LF and HF powers, LF:HF, LF(norm), and HF(norm) had obvious rhythmicity in clinically normal dogs. The HF power of HRV in dogs was extremely high, compared with that of other species, and HF peaks corresponded to peaks obtained from respiratory waveforms. Blockade of the autonomic nervous system documented that HRV in dogs was mostly attributable to vagal activity.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—We determined characteristics of power spectral analysis of HRV in dogs, including circadian rhythm of the autonomic nervous system. Power spectral analysis of HRV may provide a useful noninvasive technique for assessing the effect of drugs on activity of the autonomic nervous system in dogs. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:37–42)

Abstract

Objective—To determine characteristics of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) during a 24-hour period in dogs and to evaluate the effects of vagal and sympathetic tone on HRV.

Animals—16 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedure—Power spectral analysis of HRV was conducted, using 24-hour ambulatory ECG recordings. Circadian rhythms were evaluated in terms of absolute units of low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) powers, their ratio (LF:HF), and their adjusted (normalized) units (LF[norm] and HF[norm]). Three or 4 dogs were used for simultaneous measurement of heart rate and respiratory waveform as well as to evaluate treatment (propranolol, atropine, or both) administered to cause blockade of the autonomic nervous system.

Results—Values for LF and HF powers, LF:HF, LF(norm), and HF(norm) had obvious rhythmicity in clinically normal dogs. The HF power of HRV in dogs was extremely high, compared with that of other species, and HF peaks corresponded to peaks obtained from respiratory waveforms. Blockade of the autonomic nervous system documented that HRV in dogs was mostly attributable to vagal activity.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—We determined characteristics of power spectral analysis of HRV in dogs, including circadian rhythm of the autonomic nervous system. Power spectral analysis of HRV may provide a useful noninvasive technique for assessing the effect of drugs on activity of the autonomic nervous system in dogs. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:37–42)

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